Madison County, NY

Madison County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 73,442. Madison County is part of the Syracuse, NY Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Madison County is located in central New York State, east of Syracuse, north of Binghamton, and slightly north of due west from Albany. Madison County contains the geographic center of the state at Pratts Hollow in the Town of Eaton.

Oneida Lake and Oneida Creek define part of the northern boundary. The Great Swamp, formerly located south of the lake, was a rich wetlands habitat important to many species of birds and wildlife. This was drained by local and state construction projects in the early decades of the twentieth century, chiefly by Italian immigrants. The fertile soil supported high production of onions and other commodity crops, and the Italian families grew wealthy from their work. The area was known as "Black Beach" for its mucklands. Chittenango Creek defines part of the western boundary.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madison_County,_New_York

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Cazenovia, New York
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Fenner
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Hubbardsville, New York
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Lebanon State Forest
Leland Pond
Melondy Hill State Forest
Morrow Mountain State Forest
Nelson
Nine Mile Swamp
Oneida, New York
Oxbow Falls
Oxbow Falls County Park
Texas Hill State Forest
Tioughnioga Wildlife Management Area
Tuller Hill State Forest

Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

Map: Morrow Mountain State Forest

Map: Morrow Mountain State Forest

Morrow Mountain State Forest, Madison Reforestation Area #10, occupies 1,290 acres in the towns of Georgetown and Nelson in Madison County. Morrow Mountain rises to 2,142 and is the highest elevation in Madison County.

History
Georgetown was one of the original Chenango Twenty Towns and was patented to Thomas Ludlow Jr. of New York City in 1792. It was formed from DeRuyter and named Georgetown only after the State Legislature denied a local petition to name it Washington. In his 1880 history of Chenango and Madison Counties, James Smith reports that when Georgetown was first settled it was one unbroken forest: "...the bights of her hills crowned with large straight hemlock, spreading beech and sweeps of sugar maple; swamps gloomy with magnificent pine-ancient monarch of the forest, reigning with undisputed sway over the mass of tangled struggling foliage beneath them."

Soon much of the original forest that Smith described was cut for lumber or cleared for farms earning Georgetown the name "Slab City" for the rounded side of a log removed during milling. Farms produced potatoes, butter, hops, cheese and apples and sheep provided wool for local looms. By the late 19th century however, urbanization, westward expansion and an increasing demand for industrial labor reconfigured New York's rural landscape. Between 1870 and 1930 the population of Georgetown declined 52% from 1,423 to 684 residents. In the absence of plowing and grazing, pastures and fields began the slow but steady return to native forest. Between 1933-42, the Civilian Conservation Corp recruits planted trees, built roads and erected a 67' firetower and observation cabin atop Morrow Mountain. The tower was dismantled in the 1970s and replaced with a 100' communication tower to support a New York State Police radio network.

Field Notes

On a brisk autumn day the landscape is ablaze in reds and yellows from the changing leaves of sugar maple. Maples have long been valued for their sweet sap, blonde wood and spreading shade on streets, parks and village greens throughout New York State. But their brilliant fall color has earned them a distinction as one of the most beautiful trees in North America. In Native American legend, spirit hunters in the sky slew the constellation Great Bear in autumn and the bear's blood, dripping on the forest, changed many leaves to red. Some leaves turned yellow by the fat that splattered out of the kettle as the hunters cooked the meat. Science has revealed that color change is caused by chemical changes in the tree as summer turns to winter. Sugar maple is one of the most common trees on Morrow Mountain State Forest, and a visitor can enjoy its brilliance on any day of the year. But to experience sugar maple at its most spectacular, consider a visit in October when the sun is bright, the temperature is brisk and autumn colors are at their peak.

Map: Lebanon Reservoir

Map: Lebanon Reservoir

Madison County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 73,442. Madison County is part of the Syracuse, NY Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Madison County is located in central New York State, east of Syracuse, north of Binghamton, and slightly north of due west from Albany. Madison County contains the geographic center of the state at Pratts Hollow in the Town of Eaton.

Oneida Lake and Oneida Creek define part of the northern boundary. The Great Swamp, formerly located south of the lake, was a rich wetlands habitat important to many species of birds and wildlife. This was drained by local and state construction projects in the early decades of the twentieth century, chiefly by Italian immigrants. The fertile soil supported high production of onions and other commodity crops, and the Italian families grew wealthy from their work. The area was known as "Black Beach" for its mucklands. Chittenango Creek defines part of the western boundary.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Madison_County,_New_York

Map: Beaver Pond State Forest

Map: Beaver Pond State Forest

Beaver Pond, formerly Page Pond, State Forest covers a total of 791 acres. It is named after a 17 acre pond that is partially situated in the state forest. Two tracts of land in the forest were acquired in 1940 and 1941. Two additional tracts were then acquired in 1981 and 1989. The most popular recreational activities on the forest are hunting and cross country skiing.

The forest shape is long and narrow, providing a distance from the northern border to the southern border of approximately 3 miles. The highest elevation on the forest is about 2,010 feet and can be found on two different peaks in the north section of the property. The lowest elevation is about 1350 feet and is found near the intersection of NYS Route 41 and Huggins Road. The forest has a mix of well-drained and poorly drained ground. The steepest slope on the forest is the north-facing slope adjacent to NYS Route 41. The forest cover is primarily a mix of native conifers and northern hardwoods. Only a few acres of this forest were ever planted with species such as red pine or Norway spruce. The largest block of conifer (hemlock) on the forest is located in the southern section of the forest, south of NYS route 41. The remainder of the forest is largely covered with hardwoods such as red oak, sugar maple, aspen, red maple, white ash., black cherry, and beech.

The mammals that are common residents of Beaver Pond State Forest include deer, raccoons, squirrels, porcupines, beavers, chipmunks, and opossum. Coyotes and foxes are also present. There is also a large variety of birds, including songbirds and hawks. Turkeys are also abundant on this forest, due to the high percentage of beech and oak trees that enhance their habitat

Beaver Pond State Forest is bordered by a mix of privately owned woodlands and agricultural lands. The Marsh Pond State Forest is also in close proximity. The closed section of Huggins Road is a good corridor for cross country skiing. Like the Marsh Pond State Forest, this forest is located in a rural landscape that is only sparsely populated. The nearest villages are Windsor and Deposit, which are each about 5 miles distant from the forest.

Map: Texas Hill State Forest

Map: Texas Hill State Forest

Texas Hill State Forest, is a 704-acre forest characterized by gentle and rolling terrain. There are no formal recreational trails or facilities on this state forest. A single public forest access road can be used to enter the forest.

The forest is located mostly at an elevation of almost 2,000 feet and is about two and a half miles east of the village of Georgetown. Though there are no ponds or trout streams, a tributary stream to Pleasant Brook begins here. The forest offers good hunting for deer, grouse, turkey and woodcock. Winter access is poor.

At-large primitive camping is allowed.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8108.html

Map: South Valley State Forest North Map

Map: South Valley State Forest North Map

Charles Baker State Forest is named after the first District Forester who administered it. This property totals over 9,400 acres in southeast Madison County and makes up the core area for the Brookfield Trail System. This highly acclaimed horse and snowmobile trail system has over 130 miles of trails set throughout three state forests (Charles Baker State Forest, Brookfield Railroad State Forest, and Beaver Creek State Forest) that make up the Brookfield unit management area. These three forests collectively provide 13,750 acres of public reforestation lands for multiple recreation purposes.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8225.html

Map: Leland Ponds

Map: Leland Ponds

Upper and Lower Lelands Ponds are located in Madison County near the hamlet of Bouckville.

Plant Life

Both ponds have significant rooted aquatic vegetation growth around much of them out to about 15 feet of water.

Public Access Sites

Upper Leland Pond - On Route 26, approximately one mile southwest of the hamlet of Bouckville. Concrete launch ramp. Parking for 10 cars and trailers. Universally accessible fishing pier.
Lower Leland Pond - Undeveloped hand launch, across from Upper Lelands parking area.

General Fishing Information

Upper and Lower Lelands Ponds are connected by a channel that runs through a culvert under the highway. This culvert is too small for boat passage, but it does allow fish movement. Upper Lelands offers a cold water fishery for brown trout along with warm water gamefish such as largemouth bass and tiger musky. Lower Lelands is shallower and weedier and offers a better opportunity for largemouth bass and tiger musky. Bluegills, pumpkinseeds, black crappie, brown bullhead and yellow perch can also be found in both ponds.

Fisheries Management

Upper Lelands Pond is stocked annually with approximately 1,360 year-old brown trout. Lower Lelands Pond receives approximately 155 tiger musky annually.

Special fishing regulations exist for trout in Lelands Ponds. Please consult the Special Regulations by County section of your fishing regulations guide.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/61642.html