Allegany County

Allegany County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 48,946.[1] Its name derives from a Delaware Indian word, applied by settlers of Western New York State to a trail that followed the Allegheny River. Its county seat is Belmont.

Allegany County is in the southwestern part of New York State, along the Pennsylvania border. Allegany County does not lie along the Allegheny River, as its name would suggest. The highest point in the county is Alma Hill with an elevation of 2,548' above sea level. This is the highest point west of the Catskill Mountains in New York State. The highest point of Interstate 86 is located in the Town of West Almond with an elevation of 2,110'. This is also believed to be the highest point of any Interstate in the New York.

The Genesee River bisects the county from south to north. In June 1972 the remnants of Hurricane Agnes stalled over the area, dropping more than 20 inches (510 mm) of rain. There was memorable flooding in Wellsville, Belmont, Belfast and other valley communities of the county. The Genesee River is extremely popular with canoeists (as it was a favored route for Native Americans) and the river abounds in smallmouth bass, trout and panfish.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegany_County,_New_York

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New York State
Almond Lake / Canacadea State Forest
Bald Mountain State Forest
Bully Hill State Forest
Canaseraga
Cold Creek And Lost Nation State Forest
Coyle Hill State Forest
Gas Springs State Forest
Hiltonville State Forest
Keaney Swamp State Forest
Keeney Swamp State Forest
Klipnocky State Forest
Plumbottom State Forest
Rattlesnake Hill WMA
Rush Creek State Forest
Slader Creek State Forest
Turnpike State Forest
Vandermark State Forest

Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

Map: Slader Creek State Forest

Map: Slader Creek State Forest

Slader Creek State Forest covers a total of 1,229 acres, including the recent acquisition of a 97-acre inholding. It is just north of Klipnocky State Forest and east of Gas Springs State Forest, near Alfred, Arkport and somewhat near Hornell. There are a handful of designated campsites, primarily deisgned for hunters with pickup truck campers along the dirt roads that dot this area.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/63432.html

Map: Klipnocky State Forest

Map: Klipnocky State Forest

Klipnocky State Forest covers 2,634 acres and borders both Slader Creek State Forest and Gas Springs State Forest.

The origin of the name "Klipnocky" is uncertain. Local folklore includes stories about a race of Bigfoot-like creatures known as "The Hairy Women of Klipnocky". What is certain is that Klipnocky State Forest occupies some extremely rocky and remote country. Several old stone quarries can be found on the area. The most recent quarrying was during the construction of the Almond Dam in the 1940s. Several of the old quarries have been converted to wildlife ponds.

This state land is crossed by the North Country Trail and is home to several campsites along the back roads that cross this land.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/53954.html

Map: Rush Creek State Forest

Map: Rush Creek State Forest

Rush Creek State Forest covers a total of 1,404 acres and borders the 4,475-acre Hanging Bog Wildlife Management Area. The forest cover types here are primarily native hardwood species, with a smaller number of planted conifers. There are no designated trails but hiking is allowed throughout the property. Dispersed camping is allowed throughout this property, no camping permit is required, unlike the Hanging Bog WMA which is located to the south-east of this properly and is shown in orange.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/60746.html

Map: Bald Mountain State Forest

Map: Bald Mountain State Forest

The 764-acre Bald Mountain State Forest is made up of a mixture of native hardwood species and planted conifers. There are no designated trails but hiking is allowed throughout the property.

The forest gets its name from the prominent hill (no longer bald!) near its center. Before State acquisition, the area was undoubtedly bare of trees, as was much of Allegany County, due to extensive land clearing for agriculture and pasture.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/63306.html

Map: Plumbottom State Forest

Map: Plumbottom State Forest

Plumbottom State Forest totals 1,666 acres. The forest provides opportunities for outdoor recreational activities like hiking, snowmobiling, camping, horseback riding, and hunting. It is also a source of raw material for New York's forest products industry, which provides employment and income for many New Yorkers, and provides habitat for wildlife species such as deer, rabbit, grouse and turkey. There are several designated campsites on Plumbottom Forest Road.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/51314.html

Map: Gas Springs State Forest

Map: Gas Springs State Forest

Hunting
The area is a popular destination for hunting both small game and big game. Please be sure to abide by all applicable game laws.

Hiking
The Finger Lakes Trail / North Country National Scenic Trail passes through the extreme eastern end of Gas Springs State Forest. This trail can also be used for snowshoeing and skiing, but keep in mind that some of the terrain can be challenging for these activities.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/54021.html

Map: Coyle Hill State Forest

Map: Coyle Hill State Forest

The 2,343-acre Coyle Hill State Forest provides opportunities for outdoor recreational activities including hiking, snowmobiling, snowshoeing, camping, hiking, horseback riding, and hunting.

The forest is a source of raw material for New York's forest products industry, which provides employment and income for many New Yorkers. It also provides various habitats for many wildlife species such as deer, rabbit, grouse and turkey.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/63306.html

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/49443.html

Map: Canacadea State Forest

Map: Canacadea State Forest

Operated as a flood control project by the US Army Corps of Engineers, Baltimore District. The dam was completed in June 1949 at a cost of $5.5 million and helps reduce flooding in Hornell.

http://corpslakes.usace.army.mil/visitors/projects.cfm?Id=E100240

Canacadea State Forest is located one mile west of Hornell, near the hamlet of Almond, in the Allegheny Plateau. The forest is located in the town of Hornellsville, Steuben County.

Tips for Using State Forests

Recreational opportunities in this state forest focus on rustic experiences with a limited amount of development. There are no formally designated trails. Town, county, and DEC roads provide mountain biking opportunities.

Hunting and trapping are permitted on the property in accordance with all game regulations, unless otherwise posted. Traps may not be set on public road right of ways. Body gripping traps set on land must be at least 100 feet from public trails. Permanent tree stands are prohibited. However, a tree stand or blind is allowed, provided that it does not injure any trees, is properly marked or tagged with the owner's name and address or valid hunting or fishing license number, and is placed and used during big game season, migratory game bird season, or turkey season, but no more than thirty days in one location per calendar year.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/38917.html

Map: Hiltonville State Forest

Map: Hiltonville State Forest

Hiltonville State Forest totals 999 acres. This area provides opportunities for many outdoor recreational activities including hiking, snowmobiling, camping, fishing and hunting. The state forest is also a source of raw material for New York's forest products industry which provides employment and income for many New Yorkers. It also provides habitats for many wildlife species such as deer, rabbit, grouse and turkey.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/49573.html

Map: Bully Hill State Forest

Map: Bully Hill State Forest

Bully Hill State Forest, also known as Allegany #3, totals 3,513 acres. The state forest is located in Allegany County in the Towns of Almond and Birdsall and parallels County Route 2. This area provides opportunities for outdoor recreational activities, such as, hiking, snowmobiling, camping, bird watching, nature photography and hunting.

It is also a source of raw material for New York's forest products industry, which provides employment and income for many New Yorkers, and provides habitat for wildlife species such as deer, rabbit, grouse and turkey.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/52281.html

Map: Turnpike State Forest

Map: Turnpike State Forest

Turnpike State Forest totals 4,744 acres. This area provides opportunities for outdoor recreational activities such as cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, hiking, biking, horseback riding, snowmobiling, camping, bird watching, nature photography, and hunting. The forest provides habitat for wildlife species such as deer, rabbit, grouse and turkey.

In the 1930s, Turnpike State Forest was the site of many work projects carried out by the Civilian Conservation Corps, or CCC. The CCC, established by the administration of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, provided employment opportunities for young men during the depression. CCC projects included the construction of roads and the planting of thousands of pine and spruce trees in the open areas on the property.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/51321.html

Map: Keaney Swamp Wildlife Management Area

Map: Keaney Swamp Wildlife Management Area

Keeney Swamp State Forest (Allegany Reforestation Area #5) is located in the Towns of Birdsall and Grove in Allegany County. The forest is named after the natural wetland complex that lies in the headwaters of Black Creek. Keeney Swamp is the only place in Allegany County (and one of only a handful of places in western New York State) where balsam fir occurs naturally.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/53634.html