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Eric Andersen – Thirsty Boots

"Thirsty Boots" is a Civil Rights era folksong by American singer-songwriter Eric Andersen that first appeared on his 1966 album 'Bout Changes 'n' Things. According to the album's liner notes, the song "was written to a civil rights worker-friend. Having never gone down to Mississippi myself, I wrote the song about coming back."

The song, one of Andersen's best known, has been covered by artists such as Judy Collins, John Denver, Anne Murray, and The Kingston Trio. In various stage appearances, Collins has claimed that Andersen wrote the song's last verse on a matchbook cover while in her bathroom.[citation needed]. Eric Andersen tells this story himself in the documentary Greenwich Village: Music That Defined a Generation[1] Bob Dylan also recorded this song for his album Self Portrait, but it did not make the final cut. However, it was released as a 7" vinyl single in April 2013 from Bob Dylan The Bootleg Series Vol. 10.

Andersen has stated in interviews that Phil Ochs encouraged him to finish the song, and later recordings of "Boots" were dedicated to the late folksinger.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thirsty_Boots

Phil Ochs – Another Age

"Soldiers have their sorrow
The wretched have their rage
Pray for the aged
It's the dawn of another age
Of another age
Of another age"

"Thomas Paine and Jesse James are old friends
And Robin Hood is riding on the road again
We were born in a revolution and we died in a wasted war
It's gone that way before"

"The dogs are chasing chicken bones across the lawn
If that was an election, I'm a Viet Cong
So I pledge allegiance against the flag
And the flaw for which it stands
I'll raise it if I can"

UNCOVERING HIDDEN MEANINGS IN THE DRUG CULTURE

"One of the dangers of a song like “Puff, the Magic Dragon,” is its complete acceptance by children. A recent album of children’s songs included it. There was even a cartoon based on the characters in the song. It is another example of how something which appears innocent and wholesome is used to twist minds and entrap lives."

The Byrds – Old John Robertson

"John Stuart Robertson (14 June 1878 – 5 November 1964) was a Canadian born actor and later film director perhaps best known for his 1920 screen adaptation of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, starring John Barrymore."

"Robertson was born in London, Ontario. He broke into filmmaking in 1915 with Vitagraph, then with Famous Players-Lasky, making 57 features in his career. Robertson left film in 1935, amid the increasing prevalence of sound pictures."

More from Wikipedia: https://www.wikiwand.com/en/John_S._Robertson