Chenango County

Chenango County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 50,477.[1] The county's name originates from an Oneida word meaning "large bull-thistle." Its county seat is Norwich.

Chenango County is in the approximate center of the state, west of Albany, north of Binghamton, and southeast of Syracuse. The county is considered to be in the Southern Tier region of New York State.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 899 square miles (2,328.4 km2), of which 894 square miles (2,315.4 km2) is land and 4 square miles (10.4 km2) (0.48%) is water.[2]

The Chenango River, a tributary of the Susquehanna River flows southward through the county.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chenango_County,_New_York

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New York State
Balsam Swamp State Forest
Basswood State Forest
Berry Hill Firetower
Bowman Lake State Park
Bumps Creek State Forset
Chenango River
Five Streams State Forest
Hunts Pond State Forest
Long Pond State Forest
Lyon Brook State Forest
McDonough State Forest
New Michigan State Forest
Oak Ridge State Forest
Sherburne
Skinner Hill State Forest
Whaupaunaucau State Forest

Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

Map: Bumps Creek State Forest

Map: Bumps Creek State Forest

Bumps Creek State Forest, also known as Chenango Reforestation Area #33, is a 528 acre State Forest located in the Town of Coventry, Chenango County. This State Forest is dominated by planted forests of largely Red Pine, but also includes Larch, Jack Pine, White Pine, and Norway Spruce. These forest cover types comprise about seventy percent of the forest area and were largely planted by Civil Conservation Corps in the 1930's. Natural forest stands which consist mainly of Red Maple, Red Oak, American Beech, Black Cherry, White Ash, Sugar Maple, and Eastern Hemlock cover the rest of the area.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8234.html

Map: Balsam Swamp State Forest

Map: Balsam Swamp State Forest

Balsam Swamp is a sprawling state forest that stretches almost 5.5 miles east-west across 4 towns. The area is very rural, and the landscape surrounding the State Forest is predominantly forested. Balsam Swamp State Forest is comprised of a mix of native hardwood forests, hemlock swamps, and conifer plantations. There are no designated recreational trails on the forest, but there is ample opportunity for self-guided day hikes to explore the diversity of habitats represented on this State Forest. Additionally, the western section of Balsam Swamp State Forest is adjacent to Five Streams State Forest to the south.

The main attraction of this forest is Balsam Pond. The impoundment is approximately 152 acres and is a popular destination for fishing and paddle boat sports. Balsam Pond is a warm water fishery that contains a mix of largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, chain pickerel, yellow perch, brown bullhead and sunfish. Tiger muskellunge have been stocked in the past with the last stocking occurring in 1995. However, there have been very few reports of anglers catching any of the adult tiger muskies. A shallow gravel boat launch is suitable for launching small fishing boats.

A small rustic camp ground is also located at Balsam Pond. Camping spaces are available at no cost on a first-come, first-serve basis and there is no running water or electricity. A fire ring, outhouse, and picnic table are provided for each camping space. A sign on Balsam-Tyler Road in Pharsalia designates the entrance to the boat launch and camping facility. This is a carry-in carry-out facility. Please do not litter.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8261.html

Map: Oak Ridge State Forest

Map: Oak Ridge State Forest

Oak Ridge State Forest is located northeast of the village of Afton. It is a hilltop forest, except on the eastern side, where there is a 300± foot deep ravine that mother nature carved with a small stream flowing off the hilltop. The most common visitors to the forests are hunter and woodland hikers. Purchased with Hewitt Amendment funds in the 1930's, the State Forest is a blend of planted forests of red pine, larch and Norway spruce, and natural forest stands consisting mostly of red maple, red oak, chestnut oak, white oak, American beech, white ash, hickories, white pine and eastern hemlock. The plantations were mostly planted by Civil Conservation Corps in the 1930's.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8141.html

Map: Whaupaunaucau State Forest

Map: Whaupaunaucau State Forest

The forest was named after the marten which formerly inhabited this hill along with the early settlers. Part of the Chenangadilla Unit Management Plan, Whaupaunaucau State Forest was purchased with Hewitt Amendment funds in the 1930's. The State Forest is a blend of red pine, Scotch pine and Norway spruce plantations with natural hardwoods consisting of red oak, American beech, sugar maple, red maple, black cherry, white ash and eastern hemlock. Various forest products have been removed during the years.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8096.html

Map: Skinner Hill State Forest

Map: Skinner Hill State Forest

Skinner Hill State Forest (Chenango Reforestation Area #8), located at the junction of the towns of Sherburne, Columbus, and New Berlin, is an oddly shaped forest located on old farm lands once plowed by its namesake, the Skinner family. Across its 1,666 acres you will find a mixture of Spruce and Pine Plantations, natural growing Hardwoods, open fields, and wetland areas. This diverse landscape provides the ideal opportunity for wildlife habitat, making it popular spot for hunting and wildlife viewing. White-tailed deer, Wild Turkey, and Ruffed Grouse are among a few of the game species to be found here.

Two trout classified streams pass through the forest, both tributaries of Great Brook. In some places, beavers have taken up residence along these streams, creating small ponds and pools. Waterfowl can be found in abundance in these locations. For those people who enjoy trapping, these wetland areas are home to an abundance of small mammals.

Across the length of the forest are remnants of the history of the area. Stone walls, old stone bridges, foundations, and even a Root Cellar used to hide escaped slaves during the time of the Underground Railroad can be found on the property.

Due to its elongated shape, Skinner Hill is also an easily accessible forest to reach, with many local roads crisscrossing the property. A variety of old logging roads, as well as newer skid roads provide pathways for hiking, hunting experience or, for a change of pace, bring your dog out for a walk! Parking can be found along the roadside, or on one of several forest access roads maintained by DEC.

Map: Berry Hill Visablity

Map: Berry Hill Visablity

The Berry Hill facility was created in the early fall of 1934 with the construction of the fire tower by the Civilian Conservation Corps (C.C.C.) to provide early fire detection over their reforestation projects, which today make up the McDonough State Forest. In the spring of 1935, the forest fire observatory began operating and ran continuously up through the end of the 1988 fire season. As was the case with all of the state operated fire towers during World War II, the forest fire observer at Berry Hill reported all aircraft sightings to the local command of Civil Defense, while keeping a watchful eye out for smoke. Along with the fire towers that once stood at Brookfield, Chenango Lake (moved to Brookfield in 1948) and Georgetown, any forest fire could be triangulated on a map by local forest rangers once compass azimuth readings of a smoke were provided from each fire tower.