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Google Maps: Meat Goat Production

Goat meat, aka chevon and cabrito, capretto, or kid is not a real popular commodity in the United States, although there are some very large meat goat farms in Texas and some pockets of meat goat farms in Oklahoma, Tennessee and a few other states. Most counties have some farms raising meat goats, but for the most part, it's not a major commodity, as people don't raise goats commercially much in the United States for food.

More about meat goats: https://www.southernstates.com/articles/raising-meat-goats.asp
Data Source: USDA Agriculture Census, 2012. Goats for meat. Counts. https://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/

Engineers make wearable sensors for plants, enabling measurements of water use in crops

"The tool making these water measurements possible is a tiny graphene sensor that can be taped to plants – researchers have dubbed it a “plant tattoo sensor.” Graphene is a wonder material. It’s a carbon honeycomb just an atom thick, it’s great at conducting electricity and heat, and it’s strong and stable. The graphene-on-tape technology in this study has also been used to produce wearable strain and pressure sensors, including sensors built into a “smart glove” that measures hand movements."

Chicken Labeling Terms: What Chicken Labels Mean

"When you shop for chicken at the market, there are lots of different chicken labeling terms to consider. Whether organic, cage-free or no added hormones, it’s easy to be confused about what all the labels on chicken in the store actually mean. To help make sense of these chicken labeling terms, this infographic explains some of the most common labeling terms on chicken packaging so you can feel more informed the next time you buy chicken for your family."

Round barn

"A round barn is a historic barn design that could be octagonal, polygonal, or circular in plan. Though round barns were not as popular as some other barn designs, their unique shape makes them noticeable. The years from 1880–1920 represent the height of round barn construction. Round barn construction in the United States can be divided into two overlapping eras. The first, the octagonal era, spanned from 1850–1900. The second, the true circular era, spanned from 1889–1936. The overlap meant that round barns of both types, polygonal and circular, were built during the latter part of the nineteenth century. Numerous round barns in the United States are listed on the National Register of Historic Places."

Farmers and the Estate Tax Myth

"The Farm Bureau, the nation’s largest agricultural lobbying group, has featured estate tax repeal among its key legislative priorities for many years. The current president, Zippy Duvall of Georgia, recently responded to President Trump’s tax reform plan, stating that, “Eliminating the estate tax will free farmers to invest in the future of their family businesses rather than selling off their land and legacy when a family member dies.”

The Farm Bureau is joined by national and state commodity groups, such as the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and National Pork Producers Council, in their continuous estate tax repeal campaign. This message has penetrated Republican orthodoxy deeply, and remains on President Trump’s stump speech checklist of policies to help “forgotten rural America.”

But, like so many issues in today’s political landscape, instead of offering any clear data or empirical evidence to back up their rhetoric, agriculture industry groups and their political allies are simply pushing policies that favor a massive wealth transfer. They are actively working to dismantle government spending that supports the poor, the working class, and rural communities in favor of gigantic paydays for the super-rich."

A New Vaccine Campaign Could Be The First Step In Wiping Out ‘Goat Plague’

"The virus was first identified in Ivory Coast in 1942 and has spread to some 70 countries since then. It is quite good at spreading, both by animal-to-animal contact and through the air. "It's very, very contagious," says Adesogan.

It has not reached the United States because our quarantine measures and our control of animal imports keep sick animals out. Since the acute form of the disease lasts only a week or two, quarantines definitely work. Nor has it been reported in Europe.

Now there's an effort to eradicate the disease by 2030 — to wipe it out just as its relative, the cattle plague called rinderpest, was officially eliminated in 2011 after decades of effort. The key is to vaccinate the herds with a shot administered in the neck or rump. The problem up until now has been that the freeze-dried vaccine was only effective if kept at about 39 degrees Fahrenheit. And there isn't a lot of refrigeration available in many parts of the world where the virus lurks."