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Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

Hurricane Katrina

"Hurricane Katrina was the eleventh named storm and the fifth hurricane of the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season. It was the costliest natural disaster and one of the five deadliest hurricanes in the history of the United States."

"The storm originated over the Bahamas on August 23 from the interaction between a tropical wave and the remnants of Tropical Depression Ten. Early the following day, the new depression intensified into Tropical Storm Katrina. The cyclone headed generally westward toward Florida and strengthened into a hurricane only two hours before making landfall at Hallandale Beach and Aventura on August 25. After very briefly weakening to a tropical storm, Katrina emerged into the Gulf of Mexico on August 26 and began to rapidly deepen. The storm strengthened to a Category 5 hurricane over the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico, but weakened before making its second landfall as a Category 3 hurricane on August 29 in southeast Louisiana."

The final month of summer has arrived. It’s the warmest and most mature month, and meadows run their wildest. The nights are not as long as previous months, and while it’s often hot and humid in the day, the nights start to have little hints of a fall chill that’s certain to come next month.

August is the time of Altamont fair and many people’s vacations. It will be time of sitting out and soaking up the sun, of long days out in the canoe, and climbing mountains in the early morning. They’ll be nights sitting around the campfire drinking beer and whisky, watching flames as the burn towards the sky.

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August can be a lazy month. The last of the summertime season, the last time we are laid back before our youth go to school, and before things get more serious at work as people’s vacations end. The heat makes some outdoor activities challenging, so we choose to lay back.

There will be plenty of warm days in September, but it won’t be as much summer as the month of August will be. It will be different. September will see many of the final harvests of the year, our society’s agricultural bounty, and the signs of fall. Much hope and sadness we enter that month.

Why We All Scream When We Get Ice Cream Brain Freeze

"Ah, the brain freeze — the signature pain of summer experienced by anyone who has eaten an ice cream cone with too much enthusiasm or slurped down a slushie a little too quickly."

"But have you ever stopped mid-freeze to think about why our bodies react like this?"

"Well, researchers who study pain have, and some, like Dr. Kris Rau of the University of Louisville in Kentucky, say it's a good way to understand the basics of how we process damaging stimuli."

They say that all good things must end some day. Autumn leaves must fall.”
– Summer Song,  Chad and Jeremy

Today is July 31st. That means that tomorrow starts August, the final full month of summer. We very well may have some hot and balmy days well into September, but the reality is the very short season known as summer is rapidly fading into history.Those delightfully long summer days with their balmy heat are rapidly starting to fade into the rear mirror. It’s not say that we won’t have hot and humid summer days in August, but the reality is hottest weather on average, is well behind us.

The days are rapidly getting shorter. The longest day, with dusk not occurring until well after 9 PM is now just history, gone soon after the calendar officially said summer. Now every day gets shorter – maybe only a few minutes each day, but its still fading away quickly. Now that I’m done with grade school and college, the significance of Labor Day weekend, in a few weeks, is not as big as it might have been in years past. But still the tyranny of the calendar can not be overcome – summer will be overcome by fall then quickly winter in a matter of weeks.

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Peak color will overtake Moose River Plains three weeks after Labor Day. The highest peaks of the Adirondacks will see falls beauty even quicker. Fall in lower elevations comes a little later – maybe mid-October, but even those dates are not that far away. Those colors are like the yellow on a traffic light, warning us all that winter is not far around the corner. Indeed, by the time we see fall’s beauty, it may very well dip into being pretty cold.

I like fall, and I am sure many of you do too. But it’s coming much too fast, as it always does. Please, get out and enjoy Summer 2017, before it’s too late. There will be future summers, but there will never be another Summer 2017 in our lifetimes. We all will be a year older next summer, and the we all will have changed, regardless what pretend to do.