Places

Show Only... Charts / Google Maps / Maps / Photos

Home
Topics
Antarctica
Appalachia
Country Life
Mapping
Road Trips
State Land
Urban Life

Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

After Tokyo Commuter Train Leaves 20 Seconds Early, Company Apologizes

"Passengers on a morning train on the Tokyo region's Tsukuba Express line might not have noticed anything was amiss Tuesday. But when their train left Minami-Nagareyama station, it did so 20 seconds ahead of schedule — and when the company noticed, it issued an apology to customers."

"The train was traveling northbound on the line that connects Tokyo's Akihabara station with Tsukuba to the northeast — a trip that takes less than an hour. After passengers had boarded, the crew didn't check the time, resulting in the slightly early departure "around" 9:44 a.m., the company said."

Violent Crime per 100k residents for 30 Largest Cities and Town in New York

Living in a big city or town doesn't necessarily mean an elevated level crime. There is a great variance in crime levels for the 30 largest cities and towns in New York State. Some big cities and towns are really violent in New York, some are quite safe.

Data Source: FBI, Unified Crime Statistics. Offenses Known to Law Enforcement by State by City, 2016. https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2016/crime-in-the-u.s.-2016/tables/table-6/table-6.xls/view

Percentage of Goods Stolen and Recovered

If somebody steals your car, you have about a 60% chance of getting it back. Cattle, maybe a 11% chance. And everything else a much lower chance of recovery. Cattle rustling apparently is quite successful, but probably a lower chance of success then maybe stealing somebody's firearms and office equipment is hardest to recover.

Data Source: Property Stolen and Recovered by Type and Value, 2016. https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2016/crime-in-the-u.s.-2016/topic-pages/tables/table-16

LED Streetlights Are Giving Neighborhoods the Blues

"For some, those first LED lights have been a fiasco. The harsh glare of certain blue-rich designs is now thought to disrupt people’s sleep patterns and harm nocturnal animals. And these concerns have been heaped on the complaints of astronomers, who as far back as 2009 have criticized the new lights. That’s the year the International Dark-Sky Association, a coalition that opposes light pollution, started worrying that blue-rich LEDs could be “a disaster for dark skies and the environment,” says Chris Monrad, a director of IDA and a lighting consultant in Tucson."

"When my city of Newton, Mass., announced plans to install LED streetlights in 2014, I was optimistic. I’m all for energy conservation, and I was happy with the LED bulbs in my home office. But months later, returning from a week’s vacation in rural Maine, I was shocked to find my neighborhood lit by a stark bluish blaze that washed out almost all of the stars in the night sky."

"Lately, lighting companies have introduced LED streetlights with a warmer-hued output, and municipalities have begun to adopt them. Some communities, too, are using smart lighting controls to minimize light pollution. They are welcome changes, but they’re happening none too soon: An estimated 10 percent of all outdoor lighting [PDF] in the United States was switched over to an earlier generation of LEDs, which included those problematic blue-rich varieties, at a potential cost of billions of dollars."

There are 66 back-country campsites currently digitized by the NYS DEC in the Catskill Forest Preserve. For use with your GPS, the latitude and longitude have been listed below, sorted by Forest Preserve unit. Additional campsites exist, and some have been heads-up digitized by myself on other maps found on this site, however due to in-exact location they have not been included on this list.

[Full Screen] [GPX/KMZ]

Forest Preserve Unit Campsite Office Location
Big Indian Wilderness Rider Hollow Campsite New Paltz, Region 3 42.10163,-74.51719
Colgate Lake Wild Forest Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.23919,-74.12405
Colgate Lake Wild Forest Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.23917,-74.12235
Colgate Lake Wild Forest Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.23964,-74.12338
Colgate Lake Wild Forest Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.23958,-74.12268
Colgate Lake Wild Forest Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.24121,-74.11467
Colgate Lake Wild Forest Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.24112,-74.11676
Colgate Lake Wild Forest Colgate Lake ADA Primitive Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.23938,-74.12045
Crystal Lake Wild Forest Crystal Lake Campsite 1 New Paltz, Region 3 41.86922,-75.02342
Crystal Lake Wild Forest Crystal Lake Campsite 10 New Paltz, Region 3 41.87308,-75.02943
Crystal Lake Wild Forest Crystal Lake Campsite 11 New Paltz, Region 3 41.8759,-75.02821
Crystal Lake Wild Forest Crystal Lake Campsite 3 New Paltz, Region 3 41.86903,-75.02405
Crystal Lake Wild Forest Crystal Lake Campsite 4 New Paltz, Region 3 41.86889,-75.02458
Crystal Lake Wild Forest Crystal Lake Campsite 5 New Paltz, Region 3 41.86931,-75.02463
Crystal Lake Wild Forest Crystal Lake Campsite 6 New Paltz, Region 3 41.86955,-75.02504
Crystal Lake Wild Forest Crystal Lake Campsite 7 New Paltz, Region 3 41.87026,-75.0262
Crystal Lake Wild Forest Crystal Lake Campsite 8 New Paltz, Region 3 41.87044,-75.02649
Crystal Lake Wild Forest Crystal Lake Campsite 9 New Paltz, Region 3 41.87097,-75.02645
Delaware Wild Forest ADA Primitive Campsite Stamford, Region 4 41.99649,-74.93796
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.01243,-74.82313
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.04316,-74.80916
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.04023,-74.80933
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 1 Stamford, Region 4 42.04385,-74.72643
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 10 Stamford, Region 4 42.04515,-74.72231
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 11 Stamford, Region 4 42.04597,-74.722
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 12 Stamford, Region 4 42.04995,-74.72074
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 13 Stamford, Region 4 42.04971,-74.72366
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 2 Stamford, Region 4 42.04377,-74.72538
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 3 Stamford, Region 4 42.04328,-74.72424
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 4 Stamford, Region 4 42.04206,-74.72564
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 5 Stamford, Region 4 42.0423,-74.72527
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 6 Stamford, Region 4 42.04145,-74.72518
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 8 Stamford, Region 4 42.04297,-74.72591
Delaware Wild Forest Campsite 9 ADA Stamford, Region 4 42.04334,-74.72598
Delaware Wild Forest Primitive Campsite Stamford, Region 4 41.99624,-74.94371
Delaware Wild Forest Primitive Campsite Stamford, Region 4 41.99585,-74.94107
Delaware Wild Forest Primitive Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.00052,-74.94268
Delaware Wild Forest Primitive Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.00623,-74.94263
Delaware Wild Forest Primitive Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.01187,-74.94557
Delaware Wild Forest Primitive Campsite Stamford, Region 4 41.99636,-74.96218
Delaware Wild Forest Primitive Campsite Stamford, Region 4 41.99457,-74.95989
Delaware Wild Forest Primitve Campsite Stamford, Region 4 41.99916,-74.95874
Diamond Notch Primitive Bicycle Corridor Primitive Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.16844,-74.25743
Hunter-West Kill Wilderness Primitive Campsite 1 Stamford, Region 4 42.18875,-74.24009
Hunter-West Kill Wilderness Primitive Campsite 2 Stamford, Region 4 42.18883,-74.23982
Hunter-West Kill Wilderness Primitive Campsite 3 Stamford, Region 4 42.18856,-74.23974
Indian Head Wilderness Campsite 1 Stamford, Region 4 42.09804,-74.08922
Indian Head Wilderness Campsite 2 Stamford, Region 4 42.09688,-74.08913
Indian Head Wilderness Campsite 3 Stamford, Region 4 42.096,-74.09069
Indian Head Wilderness Campsite 4 Stamford, Region 4 42.09664,-74.0921
Indian Head Wilderness Campsite 5 Stamford, Region 4 42.09727,-74.09231
Indian Head Wilderness Campsite 6 Stamford, Region 4 42.09828,-74.09165
Indian Head Wilderness Campsite 7 Stamford, Region 4 42.0985,-74.09123
Indian Head Wilderness Primitive Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.13464,-74.16232
Indian Head Wilderness Primitive Campsite 1 Stamford, Region 4 42.13514,-74.16196
Sundown Wild Forest ADA Trailer Field Campsite New Paltz, Region 3 41.91688,-74.43558
Sundown Wild Forest ADA Trailer Field Campsite New Paltz, Region 3 41.91683,-74.43548
Sundown Wild Forest Kanape Brrok By Fer Field Campsite New Paltz, Region 3 41.93334,-74.32539
Sundown Wild Forest Trails End Campsite New Paltz, Region 3 41.884,-74.35998
Windham-Blackhead Range Wilderness Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.27589,-74.10103
Windham-Blackhead Range Wilderness Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.27605,-74.1011
Windham-Blackhead Range Wilderness Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.27632,-74.09992
Windham-Blackhead Range Wilderness Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.27064,-74.11374
Windham-Blackhead Range Wilderness Campsite Stamford, Region 4 42.27042,-74.11397
Windham-Blackhead Range Wilderness Elm Ridge 1 Stamford, Region 4 42.306,-74.17393
Windham-Blackhead Range Wilderness Elm Ridge 2 Stamford, Region 4 42.306,-74.17369

Here is General Motors’ New ‘Truck’ Intended for Governmental Use

"Regardless of whether it’s brought upon us by climate change, divine intervention, or civil unrest, the end times are right around the corner — and the government is going to need a rugged and versatile vehicle for the impending apocalypse. The automaker with the chops to deliver such a platform? General Motors."

"Apparently not Skunk Works levels of classified, GM publicly announced the Silent Utility Rover Universal Superstructure (SURUS) on Friday morning. While not the classic image of a motorized vehicle, the design is intended to serve as the underlying architecture of governmental and commercial transports alike. While the specific government applications are a question mark, the platform’s fuel cell system allows it to run silently with a minimal heat signature — making it ideal for sneaking men and munitions behind enemy lines."

Google Maps: Murder Weapons By State In 2016

This map shows the murder rate by state, with detailed statistics when you click on a state. Alabama and Florida are excluded on this map as these states don't report the necessary data to the US DOJ. Fields ending with '_1' represent the number of murders per million residents.

Data Source: US DOJ / FBI. Unified Crime Reporting System. Murders, by Weapon-type. Table 12. https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2016/crime-in-the-u.s.-2016/topic-pages/violent-crime/murder

Study Shows That Cities Are Safer Than Rural Areas, Despite Crime

"Now it’s true that the risk of homicide is greater in big cities than it is in the countryside. But the study, which analyzed 1,295,919 deaths from injury between 1999 and 2006, found the rate of dying from an unintentional injury is over 15 times higher than that of homicide for the population as a whole. Whether you live in rural areas or the city, you’re much less likely to die from a gunshot wound — either from someone else or self-inflicted — than you are in a simple accident. Especially car crashes, which make up the bulk of unintentional injury deaths — motor-vehicle-injury-related deaths occurred at a rate that is more than 1.4 times higher than the next leading cause of death."

Percentage of Murders Committed with Firearms, 2016

Despite popular stereotypes, generally the Western and Upper Mid-Western States have the lowest percentage of homicides committed with firearms while the southern states have some of the highest. Started states (Alabama and Illinois) are those with incomplete data. Florida does not report method of murder to the federal government.

Data Source: FBI, Unified Crime Reporting System, 2016. Table 12. Percentage of Murders Committed with Firearms versus Other Methods. https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2016/crime-in-the-u.s.-2016/topic-pages/violent-crime/murder

Traffic Deaths Continue to Rise in U.S., But Don’t Blame Texting

"Traffic fatalities in the U.S. rose for the second-straight year in 2016 despite a dip in crash deaths linked to distracted driving, according to data released by federal highway safety regulators."

"Some 37,461 people died in vehicle collisions in 2016, the highest annual tally since 2007, according to NHTSA figures. The 5.6 percent rise in traffic deaths last year came after a 8.4 percent spike in 2015, which was the largest annual increase since the mid-1960’s."

"Fatalities from distracted drivers, such as those texting, fell 2.2 percent last year, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reported Friday. Deaths linked to other risky behaviors such as speeding, drunk driving and not wearing seat belts contributed to an overall gain in fatalities, the agency said. Drunk driving was blamed for the most deaths."