Washington County

Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. It is part of the Glens Falls, New York, Metropolitan Statistical Area. As of the 2010 census, the population was 63,216.[1] It was named for the Revolutionary War general (and later President of the United States) George Washington. The county seat is Fort Edward.

Washington County is a long narrow county located in the northeastern section of the State. It is known for its rich valley farm land and is part of the Great Appalachian Valley (also known simply as the 'Great Valley') which is a long narrow valley strip often between tall mountain ranges. The county transitions from the Taconic Mountains to the Adirondack Mountains, and from the Lake Champlain Valley to Hudson River Valley.

Much of the county is part of the slate valley of the Upper Taconic Mountains (Taghkanic, meaning 'in the trees'). The eastern boundary of Washington County is the New York–Vermont border, part of which is Lake Champlain. This is also the border with New England proper. The northern end of the county is part of the Adirondack Mountains. Western boundaries include primarily the Hudson River and Lake George.

Washington County belongs to the following valleys and watersheds: Champlain Valley / Lake George Watershed—02010001 [4] Hudson River Valley / Hudson-Hoosic Watershed—02020003 [5] Waters in the northern part drain into Lake Champlain via Lake George (Horican) or the Mettawee River, and then flow into the Saint Lawrence River (Kaniatarowanenneh). These waters mingle in the Saint Lawrence with waters of all the Great Lakes as they flow northeast into the Gulf of Saint Lawrence, and ultimately join the Atlantic Ocean. Meanwhile, the remainder of waters drain south via the Hudson River (Muh-he-kun-ne-tuk or Muhheakantuck), and ultimately flow south into the Atlantic Ocean below New York City. See the approximation of the watershed divide mapped in context of mountains [1] and valleys [2].

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Washington_County,_New_York

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Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

Map: Carters Pond Wildlife Management Area

Map: Carters Pond Wildlife Management Area

The Carters Pond Wildlife Management Area is located along County Route 338 in the Town of Greenwich, Washington County. The 446.5 acre management area was dedicated to Philip A. Dustin, an avid conservationist and charter member of the Waterfowl Improvement Association. The Association, a group of sportsmen, encouraged New York's acquisition of Carters Pond as a waterfowl management area.

Map: Peaked Rock Trail – Batten Kill State Forest

Map: Peaked Rock Trail – Batten Kill State Forest

The Battenkill State Forest and Goose Egg State Forest are back to back and take up 983 acres combined. There is a small, grassy parking area on RT 313, just east of Eagleville Rd. The Folding Rock trail goes through the Battenkill State Forest, crosses briefly into the Goose Egg State Forest and then back where it ends at the southern edge. Round trip is a little over 5 miles and there is an ascent of 1260 feet.

http://www.amcmohawkhudson.org/outdoors/view.asp?loc=bksf

Map: The Saddles State Forest

Map: The Saddles State Forest

Saddles State Forest does just that; it saddles the area between the Adirondack and Green Mountains, creating a wonderful place for outdoor recreation. You can photograph a moose or peregrine falcon, hunt big or small game, or trap beaver or muskrat. Acres of forests with ponds and streams border Lake Champlain's South Bay. Anglers can try the big lake for trophy pike and bass, or just relax pond fishing with the kids for sunfish.

Coming Soon: A parking area and improvements to the access road are planned for 2015. Currently, access is limited.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/99177.html

Map: Batten Kill And Goose Egg State Forest

Map: Batten Kill And Goose Egg State Forest

The Battenkill State Forest and Goose Egg State Forest are back to back and take up 983 acres combined. There is a small, grassy parking area on RT 313, just east of Eagleville Rd. The Folding Rock trail goes through the Battenkill State Forest, crosses briefly into the Goose Egg State Forest and then back where it ends at the southern edge. Round trip is a little over 5 miles and there is an ascent of 1260 feet.

http://www.amcmohawkhudson.org/outdoors/view.asp?loc=bksf

Map: Kayaderosseras Creek at Saratoga Lake

Map: Kayaderosseras Creek at Saratoga Lake

The Champlain Canal is a 60-mile (97 km) canal that connects the south end of Lake Champlain to the Hudson River in New York. It was simultaneously constructed with the Erie Canal and is now part of the New York State Canal System and the Lakes to Locks Passage.

The canal was proposed in 1812 and construction authorized in 1817. By 1818, 12 miles (19 km) were completed and in 1819 the canal was opened from Fort Edward to Lake Champlain. The canal was officially opened on September 10, 1823. It was an immediate financial success and carried substantial commercial traffic until the 1970s.

Today, the enlarged barge canal provides a convenient route from the Atlantic/Hudson River to Lake Champlain for recreational boaters. By traveling the length of Lake Champlain, boaters can access the Chambly Canal, which connects Lake Champlain to the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champlain_Canal

Map: Hudson River to NY 196

Map: Hudson River to NY 196

The Champlain Canal is a 60-mile (97 km) canal that connects the south end of Lake Champlain to the Hudson River in New York. It was simultaneously constructed with the Erie Canal and is now part of the New York State Canal System and the Lakes to Locks Passage.

The canal was proposed in 1812 and construction authorized in 1817. By 1818, 12 miles (19 km) were completed and in 1819 the canal was opened from Fort Edward to Lake Champlain. The canal was officially opened on September 10, 1823. It was an immediate financial success and carried substantial commercial traffic until the 1970s.

Today, the enlarged barge canal provides a convenient route from the Atlantic/Hudson River to Lake Champlain for recreational boaters. By traveling the length of Lake Champlain, boaters can access the Chambly Canal, which connects Lake Champlain to the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champlain_Canal