Energy in Topics


Oil Prices Fall and the Global Economy Wins – Businessweek

"Oil is in the middle of one of its steepest selloffs since the financial crisis, with prices on the international market falling 18 percent since mid-June, to $94 a barrel on Sept. 30. There are two explanations—not enough demand or too much supply. Supporting the weak demand argument: a stagnant economy in Europe, slower growth in China, and flat gasoline consumption in the U.S. According to the International Energy Agency, in 2014 world demand for oil will grow only 1.5 percent."

Why A Blue LED Is Worth A Nobel Prize

Why A Blue LED Is Worth A Nobel Prize

"Three scientists have jointly earned the Nobel Prize in physics for their work on blue LEDs, or light-emitting diodes. Why blue in particular? Well, blue was the last -- and most difficult -- advance required to create white LED light. And with white LED light, companies are able to create smartphone and computer screens, as well as light bulbs that last longer and use less electricity than any bulb invented before."

Inventing the LED Lightbulb

Inventing the LED Lightbulb

The LED was invented in 1962, with research into creating a "solid state" laser produced a visible light. Researchers in 1962 knew that "solid state" lighting was the future, but they had no idea that it would be another 50 years until all the elements of the technology would come to place to make the it a practical lighting solution for the masses.

I was at Walmart last night and I noticed how many LED light bulbs they now have on sale. It seems almost certain that traditional vacuum-tube style lighting (incandescent and fluorescent) has less then 10 years left in it's life -- prices continue to drop -- and LED lighting is now superior in most ways to the vacuum-tubes that have long lit our buildings.

Sometimes innovation takes a long time. Who would have ever thought a half century would pass before we would light our buildings with something other then vacuum tubes? Vacuum tube electronics disappeared within 10 years of the introduction of the transistor and solid state electronics, but it shows you how different technology progresses at.

Old Sylvania 300watt Clear Incandescent Light Bulb

I remember at Plattsburgh State that some of the campus meeting rooms had these massive light fixtures with 300 watt bulbs. Each campus meeting room had two of these bulbs for lighting -- while bright, they sucked down 600 watts per hour, or a kilowatt hour every hour and a half in relatively small rooms. But they were getting a lot of cheap Canadian hydropower on the campus, so replacing these luminaries with modern energy saving fixtures probably wasn't worth the cost.