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Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

The ghostly radio station that no one claims to run

"It is thought to be the headquarters of a radio station, “MDZhB”, that no-one has ever claimed to run. Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, for the last three-and-a-half decades, it’s been broadcasting a dull, monotonous tone. Every few seconds it’s joined by a second sound, like some ghostly ship sounding its foghorn. Then the drone continues."

"Once or twice a week, a man or woman will read out some words in Russian, such as “dinghy” or “farming specialist”. And that’s it. Anyone, anywhere in the world can listen in, simply by tuning a radio to the frequency 4625 kHz."

It’s so enigmatic, it’s as if it was designed with conspiracy theorists in mind. Today the station has an online following numbering in the tens of thousands, who know it affectionately as “the Buzzer”. It joins two similar mystery stations, “the Pip” and the “Squeaky Wheel”. As their fans readily admit themselves, they have absolutely no idea what they are listening to."

Better batteries charge forward

"A decade of incremental steps are beginning to pay off. In late 2017, scientists will introduce a handful of prototype batteries to be developed by manufacturers for potential commercialization. Some contain new ingredients — sulfur and magnesium — that help store energy more efficiently, delivering power for longer periods. Others will employ new designs."

Thousands sign up to clean sewage because they didn’t read the small print

"Do you read the terms and conditions? Probably not. No one does. And so, inevitably, 22,000 people have now found themselves legally bound to 1000 hours of community service, including, but not limited to, cleaning toilets at festivals, scraping chewing gum off the streets and “manually relieving sewer blockages”.

"The (hopefully) joke clause was inserted in the terms and conditions of Manchester-based wifi company Purple for a period of two weeks, “to illustrate the lack of consumer awareness of what they are signing up to when they access free wifi”. The company operates wifi hotspots for a number of brands, including Legoland, Outback Steakhouse and Pizza Express."

Thousands sign up to clean sewage because they didn’t read the small print

"Do you read the terms and conditions? Probably not. No one does. And so, inevitably, 22,000 people have now found themselves legally bound to 1000 hours of community service, including, but not limited to, cleaning toilets at festivals, scraping chewing gum off the streets and “manually relieving sewer blockages”.

"The (hopefully) joke clause was inserted in the terms and conditions of Manchester-based wifi company Purple for a period of two weeks, “to illustrate the lack of consumer awareness of what they are signing up to when they access free wifi”. The company operates wifi hotspots for a number of brands, including Legoland, Outback Steakhouse and Pizza Express."

Supreme Court rules Lexmark sales exhausted patent rights domestically and internationally

"The basis of the patent exhaustion doctrine is when a patent owner sells a patented product the patent owner can no longer control that item through the patent laws — its patent rights are said to have become exhausted. The purchaser and all subsequent owners are free to use or resell the product just like any other item of personal property, without fear of an infringement lawsuit."

"The two questions about the scope of the patent exhaustion doctrine that were presented in Impression Products v. Lexmark, were: (1) Whether a patentee that sells an item under an express restriction on the purchaser’s right to reuse or resell the product may enforce that restriction through an infringement lawsuit; and (2) Whether a patentee exhausts its patent rights by selling its product outside the United States, where American patent laws do not apply."

"With respect to the first, relating to the Return Program cartridges, the Supreme Court concluded that Lexmark exhausted its patent rights in those cartridges the moment it sold them. The Court further observed that while the singe-use and no-resale restrictions may be perfectly clear and enforceable under contract law principles, they do not entitle Lexmark to retain patent rights in an item it has elected to sell. Once a patent owner sells an item it has enjoyed the rights secured by the limited monopoly[1] provided by the patent, the Court explained citing to Keeler v. Standard Folding Bed Co., 157 U. S. 659, 661 (1895)."

Why Radar Detectors Matter More Than Ever

"DeMuro thought his detector would thwart any potential speeding tickets? Condoms break sometimes. Does that mean no one should use them? Hey Doug, what do you think will happen if no one uses detectors anymore? I’ll tell you. A large minority of Waze-tagged speed traps will disappear. Why? Because the cop hiding behind a bridge can’t be tagged by Wazers who aren’t looking for him. A detector may be the only warning of their presence. Power detector users — the ones using Waze at the same time — are therefore Wazers’ best allies."