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Cheap gas and a good economy is deadly on the roads.
 
On average, an 1% increase in vehicle miles traveled means a 4% increase in crashes due to more congested highways and more drowsy drivers. So if Americans drive 5% more, there will be on average 20% more crashes.

Chart Crashes – Fatalities, Injury Crashes and Property Damage 2006-2015

Car crashes are strongly influenced by the total number of vehicles miles traveled per year. On average every 1% more miles driven equals 4% more crashes. Vehicle miles are up 4.9% since the recession, and crashes are up 17.3% This is why car crashes dropped so dramatically during 2009 and 2010, during the height of the recession when many people were out of work and could not afford to drive as much per year.

Not seen on this chart is but shown is an associated chart is how much safer cars have gotten between 2006 and 2015 -- in 2005, 70.1% of crashes were property damage, 29.2% were injury, and 0.6% were fatal. By 2015, car had become safer with 72.2% crashes involving only property damage, 27.2% involving injuries, and 0.5% involving fatalities.

Source: Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) 2006–2014 (Final File) and 2015 Annual Report File (ARF); National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) General Estimates
System (GES) 2006–2015

Fully Autonomous Cars May Be Decades Away, If They Ever Arrive

"In practical terms, though, we’re ages from getting there. Why? As security researchers at the University of Washington discovered, as smart as partially autonomous technology is, it’s a long ways from being smart enough to operate a vehicle in anything but perfect conditions, and it’s easy to throw that technology into turmoil. Sometimes with as little as a sticker placed on a stop sign."

Cars With Carbon Ceramic Brakes Are Going to Be the Used Car Plague

"As some of you know, I'm currently mired in the search for a new car to replace my ancient Range Rover daily driver, which I've had for the last five years or so. One of the cars on my short list of Range Rover replacements is the Mercedes-Benz E63 AMG Wagon -- and while I can't afford a newer 2014-2016 model, I've been eyeing them anyway, because they're perfect for me: cool, high tech, all-wheel-drive (good for winter!) and exciting to drive.

So I found a nice E63 Wagon for sale on Autotrader, and I sent it to my friend Peri, and he replied: "You know that one has carbon ceramic brakes, right?" Apparently, the gold-colored calipers give it away."

"Carbon ceramic brakes? In a luxury station wagon?"

"I looked it up, and Peri was right. Beginning in 2014, Mercedes-Benz started offering carbon ceramic brakes as an option on the E63 AMG and the E63 AMG Wagon -- and not just any option, but an option with a sticker price of just under $13,000. Mind you, the base price of a 2014 E63 AMG Wagon was only $103,400. This single option was nearly 13 percent of the car's entire price. Imagine, if you will, a $2,500 single option on a Toyota Camry."