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Urban vs Rural Fatalities, New York Highways

Nationally, 51% of highway fatalities occur on rural highways, while 48% occur on urban highways. Rural highways, due to the high rate of speed of vehicles and cross-traffic tend to be much deadlier then urban highways, although in recent years the gap has decreased nationally. Nationally highway fatalities are declining, because cars crashes are more survivable in modern cars then in years past.

Data Source: Traffic Safety Performance (Core Outcome) Measures* For New York. https://cdan.nhtsa.gov/SASStoredProcess/guest#

Google Maps: Drunk Driving Fatalities Per 100k County Residents

Seneca County in the Finger Lakes has the highest fatality rate for drunk driver in New York State 2015. However, when you look at the five-year average, Hamilton and Lewis County edge it out for deadliest for drunk drivers. The 2011-15 average shows Yates County as third, and Seneca County for per capita fatalities in the state, due to drunk drivers. It seems like a lot of people get drunk at wineries and then go for a drive in the Finger Lakes Wine Country in New York.

Data Source: Data Fatalities by State. NHTSA. https://cdan.nhtsa.gov/SASStoredProcess/guest

Rest Area Plan Questioned by Congresswoman Tenney

This is stupid, especially because Congresswomen Tenney doesn't understand the law. The NYS Thruway was financed by the Thruway Authority bonds, it receives no federal highway funding (with a handful of exemptions, e.g. in late 1970s widening of the "free" Interstate 88 overlap).

The Thruway was built before the Interstate system, it's grandfathered into whatever state standards exist. Full-service rest areas are allowed on the Thruway, because it's grandfathered in facility. This is why there are gas stations and McDonalds on the Thruway -- even though on a normal federally funded highway -- this is not permitted. On normal federally funded highways, only facilities that may be provided on the highway is bathrooms and picnic tables. No other businesses are allowed on federally funded interstate highways (which, I repeat, the Thruway is not a federally funded road).

Even if the US DOT decides to withhold federal highway funding for some reason (like the I Love NY signs), it's a moot point, because if you withhold 100% of $0 in funding, the Thruway Authority still receives no money.

M.T.A. Tries a New Tack During Delays: The Truth

"On my way home from work two Thursdays ago, the No. 3 train I was riding stopped suddenly, just before the 72nd Street station.This, on the New York City subway, was not particularly unusual. But what happened afterward was."

“Ladies and gentlemen,” began the voice over the loudspeaker, sounding rattled. “I have bad news. A passenger just jumped in front of the train.”

Several people gasped. A woman near me jerked her head up from her phone, wearing an expression of horror. We riders did something not normally acceptable: We made eye contact with one another. A train conductor or operator speaking of a death on the tracks without euphemism: We had never heard that before."

What Are Those Squiggles of Tar on the Road?

"Spend a good amount of time driving, especially in rural areas, and you've probably noticed those messy-looking black squiggles that cut across asphalt road surfaces in what seems like haphazard fashion. But rest assured that they're not simply the result of some sloppy tar work by a road crew that decided to have a few beers before the end of the shift."

"Instead, what you're noticing is crack sealing. It's a time-honored technique for remedying the damaged road surfaces, without inflicting even more pain upon taxpayers by tearing up and repaving the entire road."

Fully Autonomous Cars May Be Decades Away, If They Ever Arrive

"In practical terms, though, we’re ages from getting there. Why? As security researchers at the University of Washington discovered, as smart as partially autonomous technology is, it’s a long ways from being smart enough to operate a vehicle in anything but perfect conditions, and it’s easy to throw that technology into turmoil. Sometimes with as little as a sticker placed on a stop sign."

Even transit leaders don’t rely on their own buses

"While politicians hold the purse strings, it's those on the transit agencies' boards who dictate how the systems operate."

"Board members for the two counties' agencies — Hillsborough Area Regional Transit Authority and Pinellas Suncoast Transit Authority — are a mix of elected officials and community members."

"None of them rely on the bus for work, errands or their personal life."

"This isn't unique to Tampa Bay, or transit. Many boards are composed of people who don't use the service they help provide. But in a region roiled by transportation problems, it's worth knowing who sits on these boards and what philosophies they bring to the conversation."

worst U.S. interstates, due to terrain

I have to agree strongly with Interstate 68 through Cumberland, Maryland. That is a cluster -- you drop from 70 MPH and make a hard 40 MPH left turn after descending a steep hill. Then throw in a bunch of city traffic merging on and exiting the interstate. It's so bad they've built massive concrete walls, so that when big rigs crash, they won't hopefully burn all of the downtown.