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Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

Here is General Motors’ New ‘Truck’ Intended for Governmental Use

"Regardless of whether it’s brought upon us by climate change, divine intervention, or civil unrest, the end times are right around the corner — and the government is going to need a rugged and versatile vehicle for the impending apocalypse. The automaker with the chops to deliver such a platform? General Motors."

"Apparently not Skunk Works levels of classified, GM publicly announced the Silent Utility Rover Universal Superstructure (SURUS) on Friday morning. While not the classic image of a motorized vehicle, the design is intended to serve as the underlying architecture of governmental and commercial transports alike. While the specific government applications are a question mark, the platform’s fuel cell system allows it to run silently with a minimal heat signature — making it ideal for sneaking men and munitions behind enemy lines."

Google Maps: Murder Weapons By State In 2016

This map shows the murder rate by state, with detailed statistics when you click on a state. Alabama and Florida are excluded on this map as these states don't report the necessary data to the US DOJ. Fields ending with '_1' represent the number of murders per million residents.

Data Source: US DOJ / FBI. Unified Crime Reporting System. Murders, by Weapon-type. Table 12. https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2016/crime-in-the-u.s.-2016/topic-pages/violent-crime/murder

Study Shows That Cities Are Safer Than Rural Areas, Despite Crime

"Now it’s true that the risk of homicide is greater in big cities than it is in the countryside. But the study, which analyzed 1,295,919 deaths from injury between 1999 and 2006, found the rate of dying from an unintentional injury is over 15 times higher than that of homicide for the population as a whole. Whether you live in rural areas or the city, you’re much less likely to die from a gunshot wound — either from someone else or self-inflicted — than you are in a simple accident. Especially car crashes, which make up the bulk of unintentional injury deaths — motor-vehicle-injury-related deaths occurred at a rate that is more than 1.4 times higher than the next leading cause of death."

Percentage of Murders Committed with Firearms, 2016

Despite popular stereotypes, generally the Western and Upper Mid-Western States have the lowest percentage of homicides committed with firearms while the southern states have some of the highest. Started states (Alabama and Illinois) are those with incomplete data. Florida does not report method of murder to the federal government.

Data Source: FBI, Unified Crime Reporting System, 2016. Table 12. Percentage of Murders Committed with Firearms versus Other Methods. https://ucr.fbi.gov/crime-in-the-u.s/2016/crime-in-the-u.s.-2016/topic-pages/violent-crime/murder

Traffic Deaths Continue to Rise in U.S., But Don’t Blame Texting

"Traffic fatalities in the U.S. rose for the second-straight year in 2016 despite a dip in crash deaths linked to distracted driving, according to data released by federal highway safety regulators."

"Some 37,461 people died in vehicle collisions in 2016, the highest annual tally since 2007, according to NHTSA figures. The 5.6 percent rise in traffic deaths last year came after a 8.4 percent spike in 2015, which was the largest annual increase since the mid-1960’s."

"Fatalities from distracted drivers, such as those texting, fell 2.2 percent last year, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reported Friday. Deaths linked to other risky behaviors such as speeding, drunk driving and not wearing seat belts contributed to an overall gain in fatalities, the agency said. Drunk driving was blamed for the most deaths."

They thought they were going to rehab. They ended up in chicken plants

"McGahey had heard of Christian Alcoholics & Addicts in Recovery. People called it “the Chicken Farm,” a rural retreat where defendants stayed for a year, got addiction treatment and learned to live more productive lives. Most were sent there by courts from across Oklahoma and neighboring states, part of the nationwide push to keep nonviolent offenders out of prison. Aside from daily cans of Dr Pepper, McGahey wasn’t addicted to anything. The judge knew that. But the Chicken Farm sounded better than prison."

"A few weeks later, McGahey stood in front of a speeding conveyor belt inside a frigid poultry plant, pulling guts and stray feathers from slaughtered chickens destined for major fast food restaurants and grocery stores. There wasn’t much substance abuse treatment at CAAIR. It was mostly factory work for one of America’s top poultry companies. If McGahey got hurt or worked too slowly, his bosses threatened him with prison. And he worked for free. CAAIR pocketed the pay."

2015-16 CDTA Bus Boardings by Route

CDTA's 905 Bus Plus Red Route is the most popular bus in their service. It got 1.9 million boardings or 11.3% of all bus boardings in the CDTA system during the 2015-16 fiscal year. Approximately 5,222 persons boarded that bus per day. 35% of all CDTA bus boardings were on only four trunk routes -- Route 905 Bus Plus Red (11.3%), Route 12 Washington Avenue (9.8%), Route 1 Central Avenue (7.6%) and Route 22 Albany-Troy-Waterviliet (6.9%).

Data Source: 2015-2016 CDTA Route Preformance Metrics, https://www.cdta.org/sites/default/files/source_files/2015-16_route_performance_report.pdf

Cheap gas and a good economy is deadly on the roads.
 
On average, an 1% increase in vehicle miles traveled means a 4% increase in crashes due to more congested highways and more drowsy drivers. So if Americans drive 5% more, there will be on average 20% more crashes.

Chart Crashes – Fatalities, Injury Crashes and Property Damage 2006-2015

Car crashes are strongly influenced by the total number of vehicles miles traveled per year. On average every 1% more miles driven equals 4% more crashes. Vehicle miles are up 4.9% since the recession, and crashes are up 17.3% This is why car crashes dropped so dramatically during 2009 and 2010, during the height of the recession when many people were out of work and could not afford to drive as much per year.

Not seen on this chart is but shown is an associated chart is how much safer cars have gotten between 2006 and 2015 -- in 2005, 70.1% of crashes were property damage, 29.2% were injury, and 0.6% were fatal. By 2015, car had become safer with 72.2% crashes involving only property damage, 27.2% involving injuries, and 0.5% involving fatalities.

Source: Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) 2006–2014 (Final File) and 2015 Annual Report File (ARF); National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) General Estimates
System (GES) 2006–2015