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Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

Google Maps: Wildlife Management Units (WMUs)

Wildlife Management Units (WMUs) are the geographical units DEC uses to set hunting and trapping seasons in New York State. This map is similar to the online one on the DEC website, however I added random colors to make the different WMUs stand out better.

Updated 9/19/17 with the Northern Southern Zone line, shown in red. You may need to zoom in to see the Northern-Southern Line clearly.

Data Source: http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/8302.html

Secretary Zinke signs Secretarial Order to Support Sportsmen & Enhance Wildlife Conservation

"Today, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke signed Secretarial Order 3356, which will support and expand hunting and fishing, enhance conservation stewardship, improve wildlife management, and increase outdoor recreation opportunities for all Americans. Secretarial Order 3356 is an extension of Secretarial Order 3347, issued on Zinke's first day, March 2, 2017. That order identified a slate of actions for the restoration of the American sportsmen conservation ethic, which was established by President Theodore Roosevelt."

"The new order comes days after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service announced a survey that found there are 2.2 million fewer hunters in America now than in 2011. The order seeks to improve wildlife management and conservation, increase access to public lands for hunting, shooting, and fishing, and puts a new and a greater emphasis on recruiting and retaining new sportsmen conservationists, with a focus on engaging youths, veterans, minorities, and other communities that traditionally have low participation in outdoor recreation activities."

2016 Bucks Harvested per Square Mile by WMU

By far the most productive WMUs for buck production is 8N and 8R in the Western Finger Lakes, south of Rochester. 14.5 times more bucks per square mile were harvested there in 2016, compared to WMU 5C in the Northeastern Adirondack Mountains. You can see the difference in harvest quite clearly from this chart. To see this laid out on map, see this Google Map: http://andyarthur.org/google-maps-2016-bucks-harvested-by-wmu-per-square-mile.html

Data Source: Data Source: NYSDEC 2016 Deer Harvest Estimates. http://www.dec.ny.gov/press/110232.html

Lead no more threat to birds than cats or windows

"The moment I read the headline I knew where the story was going."

"Bald Eagle Threat: Lead ammo left behind by hunters."

"The inference was clear: Hunters are the bad guys when it comes to Bald eagle mortality. They make it sound like we’re using lead as bait to wipe out the eagle population. It also seems to suggest that if lead bullets were banned there would be no further need to address eagle mortality."

"There was another headline that spoke to the remarkable recovery the big birds are making, right here in New York and across the country. But far too many writers shy away from that side of the story."

The Truth about Traditional Ammunition

"In recent years traditional ammunition has come under increased attack from anti-hunting groups. As such, when misinformation related to traditional ammunition surfaces, NSSF believes it must set the record straight. Let’s do that now:"

"With very limited exceptions, such as waterfowl and possibly the California condor, where, in the latter case the evidence of a causal connection to spent ammunition fragments is far from conclusive, there is simply no sound scientific evidence that the use by hunters of traditional ammunition is causing harm to wildlife populations. In the case of raptors, there is a total lack of any scientific evidence of a population impact. In fact, just the opposite is true. Hunters have long used traditional ammunition, yet raptor populations have significantly increased all across North America — a trend that shows no sign of letting up. If the use of traditional ammunition was the threat to raptor populations some make it out to be, these populations would not be soaring as they are."

"Furthermore, it is the excise tax dollars (11 percent) manufacturers pay on the sale of ammunition – the very ammunition some choose to demonize – that is the primary source of wildlife conservation funding in the United States and the financial backbone of the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation. The bald eagle’s recovery, a truly great conservation success story, was made possible and funded by hunters using traditional ammunition. Not surprisingly, recent statistics from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service show that from 1981 to 2006 the number of breeding pairs of bald eagles in the United States increased 724 percent."

"Needlessly restricting or banning traditional ammunition absent sound science will hurt wildlife conservation efforts – efforts such as those that aided recovery of the Bald Eagle – because fewer hunters will take to the field, thereby undercutting financial wildlife management resources. Alternatives to traditional ammunition are not economical. The higher costs associated with this ammunition will price many everyday consumers out of the market. This is evidenced by the low 1 percent market share of metallic nontraditional ammunition –neither its higher cost, performance or benefits are justified."