Fishing

Tossing in a line and hoping to snag a big one.

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Google Maps: Public Fishing Access Locations – Trout Fishing

This data displays the access locations of rivers and streams for fishing in New York State, as determined by fisheries biologists working for the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. It has been filtered by those streams that are listed as containing Brook, Rainbow, or Brown Trout. Balloon color shows what type of access -- boat, walk-in fishing, shore fishing, etc.

Data Source: Recommended Fishing Rivers And Streams. https://data.ny.gov/Recreation/Recommended-Fishing-Rivers-And-Streams/jcxg-7gnm

2017 NY Trout Stocking by County and Species

DEC stocks more than 2.3 million catchable-size brook, brown, and rainbow trout in over 309 lakes ad ponds and roughly 2,900 miles of streams across the state each spring. This dataset represents the planned stocking numbers, species and time of spring for those waters for the current fishing season.

Data Source: Current Season Spring Trout Stocking. https://data.ny.gov/Recreation/Current-Season-Spring-Trout-Stocking/d9y2-n436

Alligator Gar May Help Combat Invasive Asian Carp – Field & Stream.

In Illinois, wildlife officials believe that alligator gar may help fight the spread of invasive Asian carp, which are on the invading the Great Lakes. Gator gar commonly feed on carp but pose little or no threat to game-fish populations, biologists believe. Also, despite the gator gar’s fearsome appearance, there has never been a confirmed gator gar attack on a human.

Jennifer Walling, the executive director of the Illinois Environmental Council, told the Belleville News-Democrat that alligator gar could be a potential solution to the Asian carp problem, in addition to being a trophy quarry. “The more we learn about alligator gar,” Walling said, “the more intrigued we are that they could help in the fight against Asian carp, drive revenue as a target of anglers, and become a popular niche food fish.”

There is a bit of a disagreement on how much they target game fish, especially in New York in places where Asian carp aren't established.

http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/DEC-searching-Schenectady-pond-for-alligator-gar-8463420.php

"The alligator gar in Iroquois Lake [in Schenectady, NY] is just over 1-foot long, DeLugo estimated after seeing pictures of the fish. He said a gar that size could eat plenty of fish, but does not pose any danger to humans. DeLugo said he has taken many large fish off the hands of customers who move or can no longer manage to feed and house the fish. "Then I get on the phone and start calling crazy guys who have hot tubs for a tank — giant things they can put them in," he said.