Oswego County

Oswego County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 122,109.[1] The City of Oswego serves as the county seat.

Oswego County is in northwestern New York State, just north of Syracuse and northwest of Utica, on the eastern shore of Lake Ontario. Part of the Tug Hill Plateau is in the eastern part of the county and, at 1550', is the highest point.[2]

There are two harbors in the county, Oswego Harbor at the mouth of the Oswego River and Port Ontario on the Salmon River. The first major port of call on the Great Lakes is the Port of Oswego Authority dock.

The town of Orwell is officially designated as "dry".[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oswego_County,_New_York

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New York State
Altmar State Forest
Chateaugay State Forest
Happy Valley WMA
Kasoag State Forest
Klondike State Forest
Little John Wildlife Management Area
Orton Hollow State Forest
Oswego
Salmon River Reservoir
Stone Hill State Forest

Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

Map: Salmon River Reservoir (East)

Map: Salmon River Reservoir (East)

The Salmon River arises in north central New York State on the Tug Hill Plateau to the east of Lake Ontario. It flows 44 miles (71 km) westward off the plateau and there is a hydroelectric dam near Little America to create the Salmon River Reservoir. Both the Salmon River and Salmon River Reservoir are heavily visited destinations for fishermen during peak season. Below the dam it continues westward for about a mile eventually creating Salmon River Falls which is a large 100-foot (30 m) drop as the river continues its westward progress towards yet another dam and the Lower Salmon River Reservoir. It continues westward through the village of Altmar through Pulaski to Lake Ontario. The inlet is referred to as Port Ontario, though it is no longer an active commercial port. The watershed drains 285 square miles (740 km2).[1]

The river is noted for its recreational salmon fishery today. The fishery is possible due to the efforts of the Salmon River Fish Hatchery that is located north of Altmar on a tributary to the Salmon River called Beaver Dam Brook. The hatchery stocks over 3.5 million trout and salmon each year in the surrounding areas.[2] In early history this was Atlantic salmon, but now these have been mostly replaced by stocked coho, chinook, and steelhead which make spawning runs upriver from Lake Ontario in autumn.

The river has become a popular location for kayaking and river rafting during parts of the year when the dam is released, with several companies making excursions to the river.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmon_River_%28New_York%29
http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/60775.html
http://www.quietkayaking.webs.com/qknyssalmonriver.html

Map: Peter Scott Swamp Freshwater Wetlands

Map: Peter Scott Swamp Freshwater Wetlands

Oswego County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 122,109.[1] The City of Oswego serves as the county seat.

Oswego County is in northwestern New York State, just north of Syracuse and northwest of Utica, on the eastern shore of Lake Ontario. Part of the Tug Hill Plateau is in the eastern part of the county and, at 1550', is the highest point.[2]

There are two harbors in the county, Oswego Harbor at the mouth of the Oswego River and Port Ontario on the Salmon River. The first major port of call on the Great Lakes is the Port of Oswego Authority dock.

The town of Orwell is officially designated as "dry".[2]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oswego_County,_New_York

Map: Happy Valley Wildlife Mangement Area

Map: Happy Valley Wildlife Mangement Area

Happy Valley Wildlife Management Area, totaling some 8,898 acres, is located in eastern Oswego County with its northern boundary transected by U.S. Route 104 and its southern boundary by Oswego County Route 26. These Routes are easily accessible off Exit 34 of Interstate 81 and hence east on Route 104 to Happy Valley. The 7½ minute topographic maps covering the area are Dugway and Williamstown.

Happy Valley Wildlife Management Area has generally flat terrain ranging in elevation mostly between 600 to 700 feet above mean sea level. The soils are generally stony fine field loam or sandy knolls. Due to the area's close proximity to Lake Ontario, snow depths average about 125 inches annually.

Reforestation and former farming activity have changed the original forest in much of the area. Fields in all stages of succession exist along with northern hardwoods such as sugar maple, beech, yellow birch and softwoods such as hemlock, white pine and spruce.

Wildlife associated with uplands and water are common and include: deer, hare, squirrel, beaver, muskrat, raccoon, mink, weasel, fisher and porcupine to name only a few of the mammals. A large variety of songbirds as well as grouse, woodcock, turkey and waterfowl are also on the area.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/68691.html

Map: Salmon River Reservior

Map: Salmon River Reservior

The Salmon River arises in north central New York State on the Tug Hill Plateau to the east of Lake Ontario. It flows 44 miles (71 km) westward off the plateau and there is a hydroelectric dam near Little America to create the Salmon River Reservoir. Both the Salmon River and Salmon River Reservoir are heavily visited destinations for fishermen during peak season. Below the dam it continues westward for about a mile eventually creating Salmon River Falls which is a large 100-foot (30 m) drop as the river continues its westward progress towards yet another dam and the Lower Salmon River Reservoir. It continues westward through the village of Altmar through Pulaski to Lake Ontario. The inlet is referred to as Port Ontario, though it is no longer an active commercial port. The watershed drains 285 square miles (740 km2).[1]

The river is noted for its recreational salmon fishery today. The fishery is possible due to the efforts of the Salmon River Fish Hatchery that is located north of Altmar on a tributary to the Salmon River called Beaver Dam Brook. The hatchery stocks over 3.5 million trout and salmon each year in the surrounding areas.[2] In early history this was Atlantic salmon, but now these have been mostly replaced by stocked coho, chinook, and steelhead which make spawning runs upriver from Lake Ontario in autumn.

The river has become a popular location for kayaking and river rafting during parts of the year when the dam is released, with several companies making excursions to the river.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salmon_River_%28New_York%29
http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/60775.html
http://www.quietkayaking.webs.com/qknyssalmonriver.html

Map: Littlejohn WMA

Map: Littlejohn WMA

The Little John Wildlife Management Area (WMA) totals some 7,918 acres and is located in Oswego and Jefferson Counties approximately 45 miles north of Syracuse and 25 miles south of Watertown. The easiest access to Little John is from Exit 38 off Interstate 81 via County Route 15 east to County Route 17. Town roads and state truck trails provide access from Route 17. However, the eight miles of state truck trail provide only limited access within the area. The 7 1/2 minute topographic maps covering the area are Boylston Center and Worth Center.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/68724.html

Map: Klondike State Forest

Map: Klondike State Forest

Klondike State Forest is comprised of mature natural hardwood and northern hardwood-hemlock cover types. The predominant species include red maple, black cherry, white ash, sugar maple and hemlock. There are also conifer plantations throughout the forest consisting of mainly white pine, red pine, larch and spruce plantations that were planted by the Civilian Conservation Corps between the 1930's and the 1950's.

A portion of the property bounds North Pond and leads into a naturally occurring bog. This area provides excellent habitat for many different species of rare and common plants and animals. Water fowl and insects can often be observed in great numbers. Another large wetland complex which boasts some rare and endangered species of both plants and animals lies just to the south North Pond. This diverse and beautiful area further adds to the value of this natural resource.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/63195.html

Map: Happy Valley WMA

Map: Happy Valley WMA

Happy Valley Wildlife Management Area, totaling some 8,898 acres, is located in eastern Oswego County with its northern boundary transected by U.S. Route 104 and its southern boundary by Oswego County Route 26. These Routes are easily accessible off Exit 34 of Interstate 81 and hence east on Route 104 to Happy Valley. The 7½ minute topographic maps covering the area are Dugway and Williamstown.

Happy Valley Wildlife Management Area has generally flat terrain ranging in elevation mostly between 600 to 700 feet above mean sea level. The soils are generally stony fine field loam or sandy knolls. Due to the area's close proximity to Lake Ontario, snow depths average about 125 inches annually.

Reforestation and former farming activity have changed the original forest in much of the area. Fields in all stages of succession exist along with northern hardwoods such as sugar maple, beech, yellow birch and softwoods such as hemlock, white pine and spruce.

Wildlife associated with uplands and water are common and include: deer, hare, squirrel, beaver, muskrat, raccoon, mink, weasel, fisher and porcupine to name only a few of the mammals. A large variety of songbirds as well as grouse, woodcock, turkey and waterfowl are also on the area.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/68691.html