2016 County Population

One in four New Yorkers live in either Brooklyn (Kings County) or Queens County. Upstate Counties are a small part of state's population, indeed the largest upstate counties -- Erie County (Buffalo) and Monroe County (Rochester) combined represent fewer then 1 in 8 New Yorkers.

Data Source: US Census Bureau, County Population Totals and Components of Change: 2010-2016. https://www.census.gov/data/tables/2016/demo/popest/counties-total.html

Percentage of NY State Population in MTA Region, 1970-2010

The general rule of thumb is that two out of three New York State residents reside within the Metropolitan Region of the state -- however in recent years their has been a growth in population metropolitan region, while upstate population has stagnated. New York City is the fastest growing part of the state, while the Quarter Pounders (Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland), Long Island (Nassau, Suffolk), and Westchester have seen a slight growth in population. Upstate has seen a small decline each year in population, although it's decline is small compared to the growth in New York City.

Google Maps: NY Median Househould Property Taxes by Census Tract

The new $10,000 limitation on deductibility of state and local taxes won't be a problem for the typical home owner Upstate but the same can't be said about living downstate. The Census Bureau does not report median household taxes above $10,000, so parts of the state where the median property tax exceeds $10,000 it is shown as only $10,000. That number should be read as $10,000 or higher.

Data Source: MORTGAGE STATUS BY AGGREGATE REAL ESTATE TAXES PAID (DOLLARS). Universe: Owner-occupied housing units, 2016 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates. https://factfinder.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_15_5YR_B25090&prodType=table

Population for MTA Region and Upstate, 2010-2016

One way to divide the state up is by MTA Region versus other parts of the state. The metropolitan region of the state continues to grow while upstate loses population. Back in 2010, 67.3% of the state's population was estimated to reside in MTA Region, while in 2016 it was estimated that 68.1% of the state's population resides in the MTA Region.

New York City is the fastest growing part of the state, while the Quarter Pounders (Dutchess, Orange, Putnam, Rockland), Long Island (Nassau, Suffolk), and Westchester have seen a slight growth in population. Upstate has seen a small decline each year in population, although it's decline is small compared to the growth in New York City.

Data Source: County and Metro Area Population Estimates. https://www.census.gov/newsroom/press-kits/2017/20170323_popestimates.html

Google Maps: High School Drop Outs Over Age 25

This interactive map shows the percentage of the population over age 25 which lacks a High School Diploma in New York State. Cooler colors mean a lower percentage of adults without high school diplomas, a warmer color means more adults without high school diplomas.

Data Source: US Census, Educational Attainment by Census Tract. http://factfinder.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t

Growth of Capital Region Population, 1790-2010

This map shows the growth of Albany, Rensselaer, Saratoga, and Schenectady County's population from the forming of our nation to now. Major sections were broken off of Albany County between 1790 and 1810, which is why the county shows a population dip. Saratoga saw a big jump in population after the Adirondack Northway was built.

Data: US Census Total Population Counts, 1790-2010