Lewis County

Lewis County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,087.[1] It is named after Morgan Lewis, the Governor of New York when the county was established. Its county seat is Lowville.

Lewis County is located in northwestern New York State, slightly east of due north from Syracuse. The eastern part of the county is in the Adirondack Park. A good portion of the Tug Hill Plateau is in the western part of the county. The county is home to the Black River Valley.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_County,_New_York

Show Only... Charts / Google Maps / Maps / Photos

Home
New York State
Beartown State Forest
Granger State Forest
Grant Powell State Forest
Greig
High Falls Pond
High Towers State Forest
Independence River
Indian Pipe State Forest
Lesser Wilderness State Forest
Lookout State Forest
Lowville
Maple Ridge Wind Farm
Martinsburg, New York
Sand Flats State Forest
Sears Pond State Forest
Turin, New York
Whetstone Gulf State Park

Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

Map: Whetstone Gulf State Park

Map: Whetstone Gulf State Park

Whetstone Gulf State Park is built in and around a three-mile-long gorge cut into the eastern edge of the Tug Hill Plateau. The gorge is one of the most spectacular scenic vistas east of the Rocky Mountains. The park has 56 wooded campsites- some of which are electric, a scenic picnic area along Whetstone Creek, a man-made swimming area and trails for hiking and cross-country skiing, one of which circles the gorge. Above the gorge is Whetstone Reservoir, stocked with tiger muskie and large-mouth bass for fishermen, and popular for canoeing.

http://nysparks.com/parks/92/details.aspx

Map: Lookout State Forest

Map: Lookout State Forest

This 3,915-acre state forest was named for the Conservation Department's (now NYSDEC) New Boston Fire Tower that once stood on the property. From the late 1930's to the mid 1960's this tower was manned by fire observers during the dry season as an early warning system of forest fire detection. This tower, along with most others statewide were made obsolete by modern aircraft detection methods. The tower and the observer's cabin were removed from the site during the 1980s.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8025.html

Map: High Towers State Forest

Map: High Towers State Forest

This 729-acre state forest is named for the tall electric towers that were constructed on the area many years ago. Since that time, newer and higher towers have been constructed adjacent to the originals, but the name has persisted. The diverse landscape provides a range of recreational experiences. Minimal developed facilities besides town roads exist on this state forest.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8039.html

Map: Beartown State Forest

Map: Beartown State Forest

The 7211 acre Beartown State Forest is named for its proximity to a former small pioneer settlement by that name. The main access road leading from the north into this forest also "bears" the same designation. Granite bedrock forms the base for the mostly shallow, poor soils found here. Rock outcrops are common, with beaver inundated wetlands occupying the low areas.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8062.html

Map: Sears Pond State Forest

Map: Sears Pond State Forest

This 5,648-acre state forest is named for a former large sawmill impoundment on the East Branch of the Deer River. The wooden dam that held back millions of gallons of water has long since disappeared, leaving only remnants of a once locally important dam structure and water body. Sections of both the Deer River and the Mad River arise from the rolling expanse of this forest. Trees on much of this forest mimic the poor soils supporting them. With the exception of some old fields that were planted to softwoods, the remainder of the area is fairly equally split between natural hardwoods, brush land, and ecologically important wetlands.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8005.html

Map: Grant Powell State Forest

Map: Grant Powell State Forest

This 8,077-acre state forest is named after the first state district forester appointed to the Lewis-Jefferson County area. He was instrumental in most of the original local state land acquisition projects that formed the basis for the state forests that exist here today. A memorial plaque and small parking site established by his friends and co-workers can be seen along the south side of State Route 177. Adjoining this state forest to the south is the Tug Hill Wildlife Management Area that contains more than 5,000 acres of public land dedicated to the enhancement of native wildlife. Every winter large numbers of snowmobilers and cross country skiers journey to the North Country to enjoy the deep winter snow conditions of this state forest and adjacent properties.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8043.html

Map: Sand Flats State Forest

Map: Sand Flats State Forest

This 2532 acre state forest was purchased by the state in the 1930's. Its name originates from the flat and sandy characteristic of much of area. Historically these well drained "flats" were extensively cultivated for potatoes, which were then shipped to city markets via the Black River Canal. Unfortunately, agricultural practices of the time soon resulted in soil nutrient depletion and eventual agricultural abandonment of the site in favor of more productive soils. Soon after the Conservation Department(now NYSDEC) purchased the property, tree planting crews established miles of soil stabilizing fencing and planted hundreds of thousands of drought tolerant Scotch, red, white, and jack pines in a monumental effort to anchor the shifting sands and rebuild the top soil. The vigorous pine plantations that exist here today are a testimonial to the efforts of these dedicated crews. These plantations and adjacent natural stands of quality hardwoods and spruce/fir are periodically thinned for improvement by private timber contractors under the direction of DEC's professional forestry staff.

Fall Brook, a popular trout fishing stream, flows from east to west through the middle of this forest. Other recreational pursuits on the area include white-tailed deer, turkey, and other small game hunting, horseback riding, and woodland hiking and biking. Access to the area is provided by a network of 5.7 miles of forest access roads beginning at Bucks Corners on the Moose River Road. Access to the forest north of Fall Brook is provided by Powell Road (1.7 miles). Fall Brook Crest Trail (0.7 miles) provides motorized access by permit only (MAPPWD).

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8007.html

Map: Smith Road Campsites

Map: Smith Road Campsites

Smith Road is the closest road to Lowville in the Independence River Wild Forest, and is 12 miles east of Watson on Number Four Road. Offers roadside camping over 4 miles of road that wander through the Independence River Wild Forest. The first campsite, which is located at the site of the former ranger's cabin and firetower (both relocated to the Lowville Demostration Forest), offers cellphone service, in an open field setting. Other campsites along the road are heavily wooded.

Map: Whetstone Reservior

Map: Whetstone Reservior

Whetstone Gulf State Park is built in and around a three-mile-long gorge cut into the eastern edge of the Tug Hill Plateau. The gorge is one of the most spectacular scenic vistas east of the Rocky Mountains. The park has 56 wooded campsites- some of which are electric, a scenic picnic area along Whetstone Creek, a man-made swimming area and trails for hiking and cross-country skiing, one of which circles the gorge. Above the gorge is Whetstone Reservoir, stocked with tiger muskie and large-mouth bass for fishermen, and popular for canoeing.

http://nysparks.com/parks/92/details.aspx