Lewis County

Lewis County is a county located in the U.S. state of New York. As of the 2010 census, the population was 27,087.[1] It is named after Morgan Lewis, the Governor of New York when the county was established. Its county seat is Lowville.

Lewis County is located in northwestern New York State, slightly east of due north from Syracuse. The eastern part of the county is in the Adirondack Park. A good portion of the Tug Hill Plateau is in the western part of the county. The county is home to the Black River Valley.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_County,_New_York

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New York State
Beartown State Forest
Bonaparte's Cave State Forest
Cobb Creek State Forest
East Osceola State Forest
Granger State Forest
Grant Powell State Forest
Greig
High Falls Pond
High Towers State Forest
Independence River
Indian Pipe State Forest
Lesser Wilderness State Forest
Lookout State Forest
Lowville
Maple Ridge Wind Farm
Martinsburg, New York
Sand Flats State Forest
Sears Pond State Forest
Swancott Mill State Forest
Turin, New York
Whetstone Gulf State Park

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Map: Bonaparte’s Cave State Forest

Map: Bonaparte’s Cave State Forest

s it's name would indicate, this 1,435-acre state forest and the surrounding countryside have historical roots tied to Napoleon Bonaparte. Local legend, along with some historical fact, has it that Napoleon Bonaparte's brother and his family escaped from Europe to this area after his famous brother was arrested. It is said that they eluded hired assassins by hiding out in the rocky ledges and small caves on the northwest edge of what is today known as Green Pond. Most of this forest is natural hard maple, red maple, hemlock, basswood and a small but unique component of black ash. Black ash is harvested locally and is used by artisans in the making of baskets.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8060.html

Map: Beartown State Forest

Map: Beartown State Forest

The 7211 acre Beartown State Forest is named for its proximity to a former small pioneer settlement by that name. The main access road leading from the north into this forest also "bears" the same designation. Granite bedrock forms the base for the mostly shallow, poor soils found here. Rock outcrops are common, with beaver inundated wetlands occupying the low areas.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8062.html

Map: Cobb Creek State Forest

Map: Cobb Creek State Forest

This 2,185-acre state forest is named for a major stream, Cobb Creek, which, over the millennia, has cut a deep gulf through the native limestone underlying the property. This area, consisting of undulating ridges and deep creek beds, is quite typical of the Tug Hill Plateau. In addition to Cobb Creek, two other streams, Mud Creek and Silver Brook help to drain the seasonal rains and deep winter snow.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8058.html

Map: East Osceola State Forest

Map: East Osceola State Forest

The 1,975-acre state forest is managed for the purpose of reforestation, wildlife management, timber production, recreation and watershed protection. Early settlers to the area named the bustling crossroads community after the famous Seminole Chieftain Osceola, which in turn, is how the property received its name. There are also three detached forest preserve parcels adjacent to the property that allow public usage but have limited access.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8050.html

Map: Grant Powell State Forest

Map: Grant Powell State Forest

This 8,077-acre state forest is named after the first state district forester appointed to the Lewis-Jefferson County area. He was instrumental in most of the original local state land acquisition projects that formed the basis for the state forests that exist here today. A memorial plaque and small parking site established by his friends and co-workers can be seen along the south side of State Route 177. Adjoining this state forest to the south is the Tug Hill Wildlife Management Area that contains more than 5,000 acres of public land dedicated to the enhancement of native wildlife. Every winter large numbers of snowmobilers and cross country skiers journey to the North Country to enjoy the deep winter snow conditions of this state forest and adjacent properties.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8043.html

Map: Mohawk Springs State Forest

Map: Mohawk Springs State Forest

The 7211 acre Beartown State Forest is named for its proximity to a former small pioneer settlement by that name. The main access road leading from the north into this forest also "bears" the same designation. Granite bedrock forms the base for the mostly shallow, poor soils found here. Rock outcrops are common, with beaver inundated wetlands occupying the low areas.

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/8062.html

Map: Smith Road Campsites

Map: Smith Road Campsites

Smith Road is the closest road to Lowville in the Independence River Wild Forest, and is 12 miles east of Watson on Number Four Road. Offers roadside camping over 4 miles of road that wander through the Independence River Wild Forest. The first campsite, which is located at the site of the former ranger's cabin and firetower (both relocated to the Lowville Demostration Forest), offers cellphone service, in an open field setting. Other campsites along the road are heavily wooded.

Map: Pine Lake

Map: Pine Lake

Pine Lake in the Independence River Wild Forest in the Western Adirondacks is located 1.5 miles south west of the Big Otter Lake Parking Area, which is 3.5 miles east of the wild forest boundary on Partridgeville Road. There is a lean-to and campsite located on this remote Adirondack lake.