2017 September 15

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Questions? Need an updated map? Email me andy@andyarthur.org.

Ash trees disappearing across Pennsylvania

"The outlook is grim, but not hopeless."

"The emerald ash borer has devastated a research plot of 2,100 ash trees at the edge of Penn State's University Park. Kim Steiner, currently director of The Arboretum at Penn State, in 1978 planted seeds from green ash trees to understand how species adapt to their environments. The ash plantation is the largest collection of green ash germplasm at one location in the world and could play a significant role in saving the species."

"We have about 15 trees remaining that show little or no die-back from emerald ash borer," Steiner said. "They look pretty healthy, and we know that most of them have been attacked because they have exit holes where the adults have emerged after feeding on the inner bark."

"Any level of genetic-based resistance could be something to build on to save the species, she said."

"Penn State molecular geneticist John Carlson is looking at the genetic mechanisms by which surviving trees might be battling the insects. He has seen some biochemical or genetic responses. He and Steiner have been talking with DCNR officials about planting Penn State's lingering ash trees on state forest lands and in private forests."

"Some trees inoculated with eggs from the ash borer actually seem to kill beetle larvae, according to research by Jennifer Koch at the U.S. Forest Service Laboratory in Delaware, Ohio."

"DCNR plans to treat about 200 trees across Pennsylvania's 20 state forest districts, try biological controls at 10 sites and protect three seed orchards."

Map: Charleston State Forest – South

Map: Charleston State Forest – South

The Charleston State Forest and the Rural Grove State Forest contain a large portion of what was called the Clarke Lands. James Clarke, the original grantee, had a three life lease with the tenants on the land. Clarke's great grandson raised the rent when the three life lease expired. This happened in the 1840's during the height of the anti-rent wars and resulted in much of the land being abandoned. Rather than leave the houses and barns that they had built intact for Clarke's great grandson to benefit from, many of the tenants set fire to their homesteads when they abandoned them. The abandoned lands were vacant and unproductive for a long time. The Town of Charleston lost over two thirds of its population between the 1840's and 1900 (Beers, 1878).

The Warrior Trail is a path running generally north to south through Charleston State Forest near the Waite Drive area. It was said to have been a major access route for Indians to access the coast from the Mohawk River. It was also reportedly used by Johnson's Raiders in 1780.

The Sara Lib/Gordon Road area was reportedly used as a Tory training ground during the Revolutionary War. While plowing a fire break in the area in the 1950's, a Revolutionary War Era sword was found in the ground and is still housed in the Charleston Town Historical Society Museum (Whiting, 2004).

Rural Grove State Forest was named after the nearby hamlet of Rural Grove, which had previously been called Leatherville because of the tannin industry present in the area at the time. Rural Grove's most prominent resident during that time, John Bowdish, suggested the name. Bowdish is given credit as the father of the free school system. He operated a store and post office in the hamlet (Farquhar, 2004).

Yatesville Falls, historically known as Buttermilk Falls, was the site of a gristmill owned by the Vrooman family. General George Washington and his entourage reportedly spent the night at Vrooman's house in Yatesville (site of present day Randall). Several Mohawk Indian villages are known to have been located near this State Forest. They generally date back to the 1600's (Marino, 2004).

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/35832.html

Map: Charleston State Forest – North

Map: Charleston State Forest – North

The Charleston State Forest and the Rural Grove State Forest contain a large portion of what was called the Clarke Lands. James Clarke, the original grantee, had a three life lease with the tenants on the land. Clarke's great grandson raised the rent when the three life lease expired. This happened in the 1840's during the height of the anti-rent wars and resulted in much of the land being abandoned. Rather than leave the houses and barns that they had built intact for Clarke's great grandson to benefit from, many of the tenants set fire to their homesteads when they abandoned them. The abandoned lands were vacant and unproductive for a long time. The Town of Charleston lost over two thirds of its population between the 1840's and 1900 (Beers, 1878).

The Warrior Trail is a path running generally north to south through Charleston State Forest near the Waite Drive area. It was said to have been a major access route for Indians to access the coast from the Mohawk River. It was also reportedly used by Johnson's Raiders in 1780.

The Sara Lib/Gordon Road area was reportedly used as a Tory training ground during the Revolutionary War. While plowing a fire break in the area in the 1950's, a Revolutionary War Era sword was found in the ground and is still housed in the Charleston Town Historical Society Museum (Whiting, 2004).

Rural Grove State Forest was named after the nearby hamlet of Rural Grove, which had previously been called Leatherville because of the tannin industry present in the area at the time. Rural Grove's most prominent resident during that time, John Bowdish, suggested the name. Bowdish is given credit as the father of the free school system. He operated a store and post office in the hamlet (Farquhar, 2004).

Yatesville Falls, historically known as Buttermilk Falls, was the site of a gristmill owned by the Vrooman family. General George Washington and his entourage reportedly spent the night at Vrooman's house in Yatesville (site of present day Randall). Several Mohawk Indian villages are known to have been located near this State Forest. They generally date back to the 1600's (Marino, 2004).

http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/35832.html

Good morning! Bus stop, Wendy please share my umbrella. And with that song, our Friday gets underway. Next Friday is when Autumn Begins. Dark and cloudy and 66 degrees in Delmar. Calm wind. The dew point is 61 degrees. Going to warm up as the day progresses, with the skies will clear around 3 pm.

Getting ready for camp this morning. Such a very dark morning for sure. I made some grands bisckets up in the oven and are currently starting to pack my clothes. Then I will take a shower, pack personal gear and a few other things in the truck. I wanted to leave by 8:45 AM so I can get to work as close to on time, so I can leave work close to on time.

Today will have isolated showers, then scattered showers and thunderstorms after noon. Partly sunny, with a high of 81 degrees at 3pm. Eight degrees above normal. Maximum dew point of 67 at 11am. Hazy, hot and humid late summer day. North wind 3 to 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 30%. New rainfall amounts of less than a tenth of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms. A year ago, we had mostly sunny skies. The high last year was 71 degrees. The record high of 92 was set in 1915.

The sun will set at 7:04 pm with dusk around 7:32 pm, which is one minute and 46 seconds earlier than yesterday. At sunset, look for partly cloudy conditions and 75 degrees. The dew point will be 65 degrees. There will be a calm wind. Today will have 12 hours and 27 minutes of daytime, an increase of 2 minutes and 50 seconds over yesterday.

Tonight will have a chance of showers and thunderstorms before 8pm, then a slight chance of showers between 8pm and 9pm. Patchy fog after midnight. Otherwise, mostly cloudy, with a low of 62 degrees at 5am. 10 degrees above normal. Maximum dew point of 66 at 6pm. Light west wind. Chance of precipitation is 30%. New precipitation amounts of less than a tenth of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms. In 2016, we had mostly clear skies. It got down to 43 degrees. The record low of 32 occurred back in 1964.

I still haven’t gotten my hunting license, but I doubt I will be doing any hunting this weekend. I need to get down to the DEC headquarters to buy it at lunch but I’ve been either been lazy or busy to do it, and today I have to run errands at lunch so it won’t happen. Next week I promise I will do that.

The more I use the Bluetooth Keyboard the more I like it. It’s certainly not as portable as the just typing on the phone but if you have a sturdy flat surface to put the keyboard on, it certainly is a lot less cramped and probably faster to touch type then using the on board keyboard. Having the arrow keys is nice for editing purposes too.

Those crickets or cicadas or whatever they were really buzzing yesterday. I thought for a while I might have a loose belt or something going on with the truck but when I stopped and go out of the truck, they kept making their noise.

As previously noted, next Friday is when  Autumn Begins when the sun will be setting at 6:51 pm with dusk at 7:19 pm. On that day in 2016, we had mostly sunny skies and temperatures between 82 and 53 degrees. Typically, the high temperature is 70 degrees. We hit a record high of 95 back in 1895. Well before my time.

Well folks, I better get in the shower. It should be a nice weekend up north, especially if the colors are as good as people say they are. It’s a bit hard to know for sure, especially because the elevation where I plan to camp isn’t as high as some of the other parts of the Adirondacks.

Have a great day! Enjoy the heat and humidity for sure.